Introductory Thermodynamics and Fluids Mechanics

Introductory Thermodynamics and Fluids Mechanics

3 (1 rating by Goodreads)
By (author) 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Description

This text is an ideal introductory for 1st year mechanical engineering students. Written in competency-based terms, the text focuses on two national modules; Thermodynamics 1 (EA714) and Fluid Mechanics 1 (EA70 6). Each chapter reflects the learning outcomes for the modules. Numer ous worked examples and self-test problems are provided.
show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 472 pages
  • 179 x 240 x 20mm | 628g
  • McGraw-Hill Education / Australia
  • Australia
  • English
  • 0074702386
  • 9780074702383
  • 170,580

Table of contents

Contents
List of tables ix
Preface x
Part 1 Thermodynamics 1
Chapter 1 Energy and humanity 3
1.1 The need for energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2 Energy conversion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.3 Heat engines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.4 Availability of heat energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.5 Sources of energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
1.6 Solar energy-photosynthesis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.7 Solar radiation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
1.8 Wind and wave energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
1.9 Hydroelectric power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.10 Nuclear energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
1.11 Tidal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.12 Geothermal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
1.13 Fossil fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
1.14 Depletion of stored fuel reserves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
1.15 Energy conservation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Problems 26
Chapter 2 Basic concepts 29
2.1 The nature of matter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
2.2 Properties and processes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
2.3 Mass ................................................... 32
2.4 Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.5 Density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
2.6 Relative density . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.7 Specific volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.8 Force . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.9 Weight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
2.10 Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
2.11 Temperature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
2.12 System and black-box analysis of a system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
2.13 Reciprocating piston-and-cylinder mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Problems 44
V
vi Contents
Chapter 3 Energy 47
3.1 Energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
3.2 Potential energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.3 Kinetic energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
3.4 Work................................................... 50
3.5 Pressure-volume diagram. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
3.6 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
3.7 Heat.................................................... 57
3.8 Chemical energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
3.9 Internal energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
3.10 Nuclear energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Problems 62
Chapter 4 Closed and open systems 66
4.1 Closed system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
4.2 Non-flow energy equation and its applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
4.3 Isolated systems with no phase change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
4.4 Isolated systems with a phase change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.5 Bomb calorimeter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
4.6 Open systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 5
4.7 Mass flow in open systems.................................. 76
4.8 Steady-flow energy equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
4.9 Turbine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.10 Steam generator (boiler). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
4.11 Heat exchanger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
4.12 Gas calorimeter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
Problems 86
Chapter 5 Gases 90
5.1 Perfect or ideal gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
5.2 General gas equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
5.3 Specific heat capacity of a gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
5.4 Internal energy and enthalpy change in a gas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
5.5 Constant-pressure process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
5.6 Constant-volume process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
5.7 Isothermal process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
5.8 Polytropic process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
5.9 Adiabatic (isentropic) process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110
Problems 114
Chapter 6
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
Heat engines 118
Definition of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Essentials of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
Efficiency of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Maximum efficiency of a heat engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
Types of heat engine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Carnot cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
Stirling cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
Contents vii
6.8 Otto cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
6.9 Diesel cycle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
6.10 Dual cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
6.11 Two-stroke engines........................................ 142
6.12 Joule cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
Problems 146
Chapter 7 Heat-engine performance 150
7.1 Power output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.2 Heat-supply rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
7.3 Efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.4 Specific fuel consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.5 Indicated power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.6 Friction power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
7.7 Mechanical efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7.8 Indicated thermal efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
7.9 Volumetric efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
7.10 Morse test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7.11 Energy balance for a heat engine ............................. 166
7.12 Performance curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
Problems 172
Part 2 Fluid mechanics 111
Chapter 8 Basic properties of fluids 179
8.1 Types of fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
8.2 Properties of a fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.3 Viscosity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
8.4 Saturation vapour temperature and pressure of a liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
8.5 Environmental impact...................................... 184
Problems 186
Chapter 9 Compon
ents and their selection 189
9.1 Pipes, tubes and ducts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
9.2 Pipe fittings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190
9.3 Valves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
9.4 Filters and strainers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
9.5 Storage vessels and tanks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
9.6 Nozzles and spray heads. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200
9.7 Gauges and instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201
9.8 Flow measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204
9.9 Fluid-power equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208
9.10 Selection of fluid components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209
Problems 211
Chapter 10 Fluid statics 214
10.1 Basic principles of fluid statics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214
10.2 Pressure variation with depth in a liquid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216
10.3 Piezometers and manometers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219
viii Contents
10.4 Static-fluid-pressure forces on surfaces ....................... . 223
227
229
10.5 Buoyancy force .......................................... .
Problems
Chapter 11
11.1
11.2
11.3
11.4
11.5
11.6
Fluid flow
Basic principles .......................................... .
Volume-flow and mass-flow rates ........................... .
Continuity equation ...................................... .
Head .................................................. .
Bernoulli equation ....................................... .
Head loss ............................................... .
Problems
235
235
237
238
240
241
248
251
Chapter 12 Fluid power 254
254
255
257
257
258
261
12.1 Fluid power and head ..................................... .
12.2 Fluid power and pressure head .............................. .
12.3 Fluid power and head loss ................................. .
12.4 Efficiency of fluid machinery ............................... .
12.5 Bernoulli equation with fluid machinery ...................... .
Problems
Chapter 13
13.1
13.2
13.3
13.4
13.5
13.6
13.7
Forces developed by flowing fluids
The impulse-momentum equation ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a perpendicular flat surface ................... .
Fluid jet striking an inclined flat surface ...................... .
Fluid jet striking a curved surface ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a moving surface ........................... .
Fluid jet striking a series of moving surfaces ................... .
Enclosed fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... .
Problems
266
266
268
269
271
273
274
276
279
Solutions to self-test problems 283
Appendixes
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Index
10
11
12
13
Principal symbols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Principal equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309
Approximate relative atomic and molecular masses of some elements 313
Specific heat capacity of some substances (medium-temperature range) 314
Pressure-height relationship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315
Characteristic gas constant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316
Isothermal work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 317
Polytropic pressure-volume-temperature relationships. . . . . . . . . . . . 318
Polytropic work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320
Adiabatic index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 321
Carnot efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322
Otto-cycle efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324
Proof of Archimedes principle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326
327
List of Tables
1.1 Typical energy uses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
1.2 Significant energy-conversion processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.3 Typical energy-conversion efficiencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
3.1 Some forms of energy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
5.1 Comparison summary of gas processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
show more

Rating details

1 rating
3 out of 5 stars
5 0% (0)
4 0% (0)
3 100% (1)
2 0% (0)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X