An Introduction to the Theory of Electricity, with Numerous Examples

An Introduction to the Theory of Electricity, with Numerous Examples

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...common surface, and galvanic circuits are set up through the zinc itself, which rapidly consume it, and interfere entirely with the action of the cell. To avoid this, the zinc plate used is rubbed over with mercury, which forms a pasty amalgam with the zinc, gives the latter a uniform surface for the action of the acid, and prevents the local circuits. The mercury itself is not attacked by the acid, but seems to improve the action of the cell by raising the difference of potential at the zinc plate. By this means and the employment of various contrivances for ejecting the reduced zinc and supplying the other substances, batteries of the constant class can be kept in working order (as for telegraph purposes) for months without further care than the occasional filling up with acidulated water. 153. The power of a galvanic cell may be increased to an unlimited extent by increasing the number of cells and arranging them in various combinations or batteries: the combination most suitable being determined by the circumstances of each particular case. It will be right here to consider the electromotive force in two arrangements, by compounding which all others are produced. These arrangements are the compound and simple circuit, or as they are now called ' series' and 'parallel.' In the compound circuit or series all the cells are arranged so that the platinode of one cell is joined to the zincode of the next, the circuit being completed by joining the zincode of the first cell to the platinode of the last. The arrangement with three cells, A, B, C, can be illustrated thus. B Fig. 51. If S be the fluid and the zincode of A be to earth, the potential at the zincode of B is Z S + S I P + P I ZorE. The rise of potential between the zincodes of B and C will...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 88 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 172g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236496051
  • 9781236496058