An Introduction to Theories of Human Development
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An Introduction to Theories of Human Development

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Description

This brief, accessible core text provides a comprehensive view of the major developmental perspectives in a way that should appeal especially to students going on to applied careers in the social and behavioral sciences, education, and the human services and other helping professions. Neither overly detailed nor unnecessarily technical, it is intended as a basic introduction. At the same time, the author does not "talk down" or condescend to the reader. He emphasizes the applied nature of these developmental theories, not only in the text material but also with features such as boxed highlights. The book is organized into five major parts, beginning with an introduction to the primary concepts and important ideas about human development and research and then grouping various theories into four major theoretical perspectives--maturational and biological, psychodynamic, behavioral, and cognitive developmental--before concluding with an integrative chapter that compares the various theories covered.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 368 pages
  • 187 x 231 x 19.3mm | 620g
  • Thousand Oaks, United States
  • English
  • 0761926399
  • 9780761926399
  • 1,241,674

Table of contents

PART ONE. AN INTRODUCTION & IMPORTANT IDEAS
1. An Introduction to the Study of Human Development
2. Trends & Issues in Human Development
PART TWO. THE MATURATIONAL & BIOLOGICAL APPROACHES
Arnold Gesell and the Maturational Model
4. The Importance of Biology: Sociobiology & Ethology
PART THREE. THE PSYCHODYNAMIC APPROACH
5. Sigmund Freud's Psychosexual Theory
6. Erik Erikson's Focus on Psychosocial Development
PART FOUR. THE BEHAVIORAL PERSPECTIVE
7. The Behavioral Models of Development
8. Social Learning Theory
PART FIVE. THE COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENTAL VIEW
9. Jean Piaget's Cognitive Model
10. Lev Vygotsky's Sociocultural Theory of Development
PART SIX. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS
11. Comparing Theories of Human Development
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Review quote

Overall, An Introduction to Theories of Human Development is an excellent introduction for students who are already grounded - or who at the very least intend to become grounded - in traditional ways of 'doing science.' It is clear and well structured, reader-friendly (including summary boxes, illustrations, highlights of important points, and employs jargon only where it is necessary - without oversimplifying or dumbing down), orients to up-to-date additional readings and web sites, and, not irrelevant for students, it is not too expensive -- Michael Bamberg "A fine choice for a classic theories course, and I believe that the level of presentation would be appropriate for advanced undergraduate or graduate students. . . . The up-to-date web sites at the end of each section are a definite plus. The choice of sites is excellent."


-- Cosby Steele Rogers "In general, I found the websites and references listed at the end of each chapter to be very interesting and useful for taking students beyond what is in the text."


-- Jane Ledingham "The book is well written and the theorists and their respective work are well-presented and clearly explained. . . . As a text dealing with the historical overview of major theorists and their work in human development over the last century or so, it is extremely strong and could be widely used in a variety of both undergraduate and graduate courses."


-- Ann C. Diver-Stamnes
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About Neil J. Salkind

Neil J. Salkind received his PhD in human development from the University of Maryland, and after teaching for 35 years at the University of Kansas, he was Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology and Research in Education, where he collaborated with colleagues and work with students. His early interests were in the area of children's cognitive development, and after research in the areas of cognitive style and (what was then known as) hyperactivity, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina's Bush Center for Child and Family Policy. His work then changed direction to focus on child and family policy, specifically the impact of alternative forms of public support on various child and family outcomes. He delivered more than 150 professional papers and presentations; written more than 100 trade and textbooks; and is the author of Statistics for People Who (Think They) Hate Statistics (SAGE), Theories of Human Development (SAGE), and Exploring Research (Prentice Hall). He has edited several encyclopedias, including the Encyclopedia of Human Development, the Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics, and the Encyclopedia of Research Design. He was editor of Child Development Abstracts and Bibliography for 13 years. He lived in Lawrence, Kansas, where he liked to read, swim with the River City Sharks, work as the proprietor and sole employee of big boy press, bake brownies (see www.statisticsforpeople.com for the recipe), and poke around old Volvos and old houses.
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Rating details

8 ratings
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