An Introduction to the Rhythmic and Metric of the Classical Languages; To Which Are Added the Lyric Parts of the Medea of Euripedes and the Antigone of Sophocles, with Rhythmical Schemes and Commentary

An Introduction to the Rhythmic and Metric of the Classical Languages; To Which Are Added the Lyric Parts of the Medea of Euripedes and the Antigone of Sophocles, with Rhythmical Schemes and Commentary

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...is not complete without it. The caesura is of more weight in melic than in merely rhythmical verse, but is still of especial importance in recitation, on account of which it will be discussed more at length under the "recitative types." IV. The new sentence may begin anywhere within a word. Here, therefore, regard is no longer paid to grammatical speech: the music is predominant and, within the bounds of the limitations given in Book II., arranges its notes at will without reference to the spoken word. This practice could have arisen only in a language whose words were spoken very rapidly even when separated by marks of punctuation. This sort of close of the sentence needs no especial name, since the melody is not affected by the absence of the word-pause. It is obvious e. g. in the second English illustration in this paragraph, "When other lips," etc., that the melody would not be affected, if in place of the words that fall to the last two notes of the second full bar and the first note of the third, a single word should occur, if that were possible. In Greek poetry that was sung the caesura certainly did not signify "a pause. In a verse, therefore, like _w-Vw-v/w_, wll_w_wi__AII, if a new part of the melody begins just after the comma, we shall use the expression "caesura," no matter whether a word end at this point or not. In the same way we regard it a case of "diaeresis," in the trochaic tetrameter e. g., II _ v, _ w _ w I _ A II, even if the first sentence ends in the middle of a word. If, on the other hand, the first sentence end with a syncopated measure ( 11, 3), so that two theses come together without intervening arsis, as in the following example from Aeschylus, we have what may be...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236514149
  • 9781236514141