Introduction to Logic
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Introduction to Logic

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Introduction to Logic is clear and concise, uses interesting examples (many philosophical in nature), and has easy-to-use proof methods. Its key features, retained in this Third Edition, include: * simpler ways to test arguments, including an innovative proof method and the star test for syllogisms; * a wide scope of materials, suiting it for introductory or intermediate courses; * engaging examples, from philosophy and everyday life; * useful for self-study and preparation for standardized tests, like the LSAT; * a reasonable price (a third the cost of some competitors); and * exercises that correspond to the free LogiCola instructional program. This Third Edition: * improves explanations, especially on areas that students find difficult; * has a fuller explanation of traditional Copi proofs and of truth trees; and * updates the companion LogiCola software, which now is touch friendly (for use on Windows tablets and touch monitors), installs more easily on Windows and Macintosh, and adds exercises on Copi proofs and on truth trees. You can still install LogiCola for free (from http://www.harryhiker.com/lc or http://www.routledge.com/cw/gensler).show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 428 pages
  • 178 x 254 x 31.75mm | 907g
  • Taylor & Francis Ltd
  • ROUTLEDGE
  • London, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised
  • 3rd Revised edition
  • 1138910589
  • 9781138910584
  • 1,226,877

About Harry J. Gensler

Harry J. Gensler, S.J., is Professor of Philosophy at Loyola University Chicago. His fourteen earlier books include Godel's Theorem Simplified (1984), Formal Ethics (1996), Catholic Philosophy Anthology (2005), Historical Dictionary of Logic (2006), Historical Dictionary of Ethics (2008), Ethics: A Contemporary Introduction (1998 & 2011), Ethics and the Golden Rule (2013), and Ethics and Religion (2016).show more

Review quote

"Equal parts eloquent and instructive, Gensler has once again provided an invaluable resource for those looking to master the fundamental principles of logic. The Third Edition improves upon an already exceptional text by infusing the introduction of new concepts with enhanced clarity, rendering even the most challenging material a joy to teach. The updated LogicCola program is sure to become an indispensable component of my own introductory course." --Christopher Haley, Waynesburg University, USA "This Third Edition improves on a book that was already superb. I have used Gensler's book to teach introductory courses in logic to undergraduate philosophers and linguists, and the response from the students has always been positive. They appreciate its clear explanation and the wealth of examples and practice opportunities it provides. In particular, the translation exercises help to refine logico-semantic intuitions. The supporting LogiCola software, which is feely downloadable, is a great support tool." --Mark Jary, University of Roehampton, UK "The Third Edition is an improved version of an already excellent introduction to logic. Gensler's Reductio proof procedure enables a seamless transition from elementary propositional logic to quantification theory and more advanced modal logics. Many of the exercises involve formulations of philosophical problems. The explanations of advanced topics have been greatly improved. The upgraded LogiCola program now supports alternative proof procedures. This book is a winner!" --Michael Bradie, Bowling Green State University, USAshow more

Table of contents

Preface ix Chapter 1: Introduction 1 1.1 Logic 1 1.3 Sound arguments 3 1.2 Valid arguments 1 1.4 The plan of this book 5 PART ONE SYLLOGISTIC, INFORMAL, AND INDUCTIVE LOGIC Chapter 2: Syllogistic Logic 6 2.1 Easier translations 6 2.5 Deriving conclusions 18 2.2 The star test 8 2.6 Venn diagrams 22 2.3 English arguments 11 2.7 Idiomatic arguments 26 2.4 Harder translations 15 2.8 The Aristotelian view 29 Chapter 3: Meaning and Definitions 31 3.1 Uses of language 31 3.5 Making distinctions 44 3.2 Lexical definitions 33 3.6 Analytic and synthetic 45 3.3 Stipulative definitions 38 3.7 A priori and a posteriori 47 3.4 Explaining meaning 40 Chapter 4: Fallacies and Argumentation 51 4.1 Good arguments 51 4.4 Constructing arguments 69 4.2 Informal fallacies 55 4.5 Analyzing arguments 72 4.3 Inconsistency 65 Chapter 5: Inductive Reasoning 75 5.1 The statistical syllogism 75 5.6 Analogy and other minds 92 5.2 Probability calculations 77 5.7 Millâs methods 94 5.3 Philosophical questions 82 5.8 Scientific laws 98 5.4 Reasoning from a sample 87 5.9 Best-explanation reasoning 105 5.5 Analogical reasoning 90 5.10 Problems with induction 106 vi INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC PART TWO CLASSICAL SYMBOLIC LOGIC Chapter 6: Basic Propositional Logic 112 6.1 Easier translations 112 6.8 Harder translations 132 6.2 Basic truth tables 115 6.9 Idiomatic arguments 134 6.3 Truth evaluations 118 6.10 S-rules 136 6.4 Unknown evaluations 119 6.11 I-rules 139 6.5 Complex truth tables 120 6.12 Mixing S- and I-rules 143 6.6 The truth-table test 122 6.13 Extended inferences 144 6.7 The truth-assignment test 126 6.14 Logic and computers 145 Chapter 7: Propositional Proofs 146 7.1 Easier proofs 146 7.4 Harder refutations 170 7.2 Easier refutations 154 7.5 Copi proofs 174 7.3 Harder proofs 161 7.6 Truth Trees 178 Chapter 8: Basic Quantificational Logic 182 8.1 Easier translations 182 8.4 Harder translations 196 8.2 Easier proofs 186 8.5 Harder proofs 198 8.3 Easier refutations 191 8.6 Copi proofs 203 Chapter 9: Relations and Identity 207 9.1 Identity translations 207 9.5 Relational proofs 220 9.2 Identity proofs 209 9.6 Definite descriptions 227 9.3 Easier relations 214 9.7 Copi proofs 229 9.4 Harder relations 216 CONTENTS v i i PART THREE ADVANCED SYMBOLIC SYSTEMS Chapter 10: Basic Modal Logic 230 10.1 Translations 230 10.3 Refutations 241 10.2 Proofs 234 Chapter 11: Further Modal Systems 249 11.1 Galactic travel 249 11.3 Quantified proofs 257 11.2 Quantified translations 254 11.4 A sophisticated system 261 Chapter 12: Deontic and Imperative Logic 267 12.1 Imperative translations 267 12.3 Deontic translations 276 12.2 Imperative proofs 269 12.4 Deontic proofs 279 Chapter 13: Belief Logic 290 13.1 Belief translations 290 13.5 Rationality translations 303 13.2 Belief proofs 291 13.6 Rationality proofs 305 13.3 Believing and willing 298 13.7 A sophisticated system 309 13.4 Willing proofs 301 Chapter 14: A Formalized Ethical Theory 312 14.1 Practical reason 312 14.4 Starting the GR proof 320 14.2 Consistency 313 14.5 GR logical machinery 324 14.3 The golden rule 315 14.6 The symbolic GR proof 331 v i i i INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC PART FOUR FURTHER VISTAS Chapter 15: Metalogic 334 15.1 Metalogical questions 334 15.4 Completeness 338 15.2 Symbols 334 15.5 An axiomatic system 341 15.3 Soundness 336 15.6 Gödelâs theorem 342 Chapter 16: History of Logic 348 16.1 Ancient logic 348 16.4 Frege and Russell 354 16.2 Medieval logic 351 16.5 After Principia 356 16.3 Enlightenment logic 353 Chapter 17: Deviant Logics 359 17.1 Many-valued logic 359 17.3 Intuitionist logic 364 17.2 Paraconsistent logic 361 17.4 Relevance logic 365 Chapter 18: Philosophy of Logic 368 18.1 Abstract entities 368 18.4 Truth and paradoxes 374 18.2 Metaphysical structures 369 18.5 Logicâs scope 376 18.3 The basis for logical laws 371 For Further Reading 377 Answers to Selected Problems 378 Chapter 2 378 Chapter 07 387 Chapter 12 402 Chapter 3 379 Chapter 08 391 Chapter 13 404 Chapter 4 382 Chapter 09 394 Chapter 14 408 Chapter 5 383 Chapter 10 397 Chapter 6 385 Chapter 11 400 Index 409show more

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111 ratings
3.84 out of 5 stars
5 34% (38)
4 30% (33)
3 25% (28)
2 8% (9)
1 3% (3)
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