Introduction to Greek Prose Composition, with Exercises

Introduction to Greek Prose Composition, with Exercises

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1883 edition. Excerpt: ...tomb at the public expense. And when this was nearly completed he sent for Pedias the poet to consult with him: for he said he had a project whence he (Pedias) would derive great honour. So he came: and Eumenes having greeted him, said he was going to have a fine tomb, and would be very grateful if he would write an epitaph, so that nothing should be wanting to make the monument complete. And Pedias replied that he would gladly do so, if he first might see the place, and know whether his skill sufficed to make a worthy epitaph. This he said suspecting that the monument would be too grand for a citizen; and if it were so, he resolved he would write nothing. And when he saw it, and found it was indeed more worthy of a tyrant, he replied to Eumenes, 'I will gladly write you an epitaph, but as you still live, I cannot write yet: for there are dead men who need my art first: either then creep in there now, that I may begin at once, or wait till you die, and I will then perform my promise.' at the public expense, Srip.onlo.. epitaph, Mypap.p.a. he (Pedias) see 27. too grand for. 58. derive honour (sense). 113. (wanting) to make, use Tov pAi. XLI.--Tompanius. Theodoras was present, among other citizens, when a sophist, named Tompanius, was discoursing to a number of persons about the laws, the right methods of establishing them, and the proper view a philosopher should take of them. And he blamed the city for always making such laws as are approved by the majority. This did not seem to him advisable: for the wise (he said) were always few, and the fools more numerous: so that the laws too became foolish. But it would be far better if they obeyed the few, and paid no attention to the many. And he said all this so skilfully...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 74 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 150g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236789849
  • 9781236789846