An Introduction to Geographical Economics

An Introduction to Geographical Economics : Trade, Location and Growth

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Description

The need for a better understanding of the role location plays in economic life was first and most famously made explicit by Bertil Ohlin in 1933. However it is only recently, with the development of computer packages able to handle complex systems, as well as advances in economic theory (in particular an increased understanding of returns to scale and imperfect competition), that Ohlin's vision has been met and a framework developed which explains the distribution of economic activity across space. This book is an integrated, non-mathematical, first-principles textbook presenting geographical economics to advanced students. Never avoiding advanced concepts, its emphasis is on examples, diagrams, and empirical evidence, making it the ideal starting point prior to monographic and journal material. Contains copious computer simulation exercises, available in book and electronic format to encourage learning and understanding through application. Uses case study material from North America, Europe, Africa and Australasia.show more

Product details

  • Electronic book text
  • CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Cambridge University Press (Virtual Publishing)
  • Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 48 tables
  • 1139164481
  • 9781139164481

Table of contents

1. A first look at geography, trade and development; 2. Geography and economic theory; 3. The core model of geographical economics; 4. Solutions and simulations; 5. Geographical economics and empirical evidence; 6. Refinements and extensions; 7. Cities and congestion: the economics of Zipf's Law; 8. Agglomeration and international business; 9. The structure of international trade; 10. Dynamics and economic growth; 11. The policy implications and value added of geographical economics; References.show more