Introduction to Experimental Physics, Theoretical and Practical; Including Directions for Constructing Physical Apparatus and for Making Experiments

Introduction to Experimental Physics, Theoretical and Practical; Including Directions for Constructing Physical Apparatus and for Making Experiments

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...which receives it from a window, the mirror being held in the proper position by the retort-stand. If the two moveable mirrors are opened only about 4 or 5cm, and a short piece of a small wax taper be placed in the opening, a whole wreath of flames will be formed by repeated reflection; the circle of flames can, however, only be completely seen by applying the eye very closely to the opening of the angle formed by the two mirrors. A mirror does not reflect the whole of the light which falls upon it; hence the reflected image is never so bright as the object which is reflected, and the images become fainter and fainter after repeated reflection. This is also seen in the kaleidoscope, for the different parts of the figure are not equally bright: the part opposite to the one which is seen by direct light is always the least bright. For investigating repeated reflection a bright object, such as a very luminous flame, must be selected, as otherwise the images will not be visible after the reflection has been repeated a number of times. The experiment with the candle should only last just long enough for observing the result; otherwise the mirrors might crack by the heat of the candle, or the amalgam at the back might be injured. Two parallel mirrors would produce an infinite number of reflected images of an object placed between them, if there were not so much loss of light as to render the images at last invisible. Nevertheless, if a candle be placed between two mirrors, a long series of images will be observed, which are placed along a straight line if the two mirrors are exactly parallel, but appear along a curve if the mirrors are even slightly inclined to one another. Two pieces of looking-glass, about as large as those used for the...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 220 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236746244
  • 9781236746245