An Introduction to Analytical Chemistry, the Practical Portion of the Author's Work on Pharmaceutical & Medical Chemistry

An Introduction to Analytical Chemistry, the Practical Portion of the Author's Work on Pharmaceutical & Medical Chemistry

By (author) 

List price: US$28.76

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1878 edition. Excerpt: ...with zinc and dilute sulphuric acid, a very similar gas is produced, called antimoniuretted hydrogen (SbH3). In general behaviour, this latter gas is extremely like arseniuretted hydrogen, except that it is inodorous, and its flame has a bluish tint. These two gases may be readily distinguished by passing them into solution of argenic nitrate, when the arseniuretted hydrogen will become decomposed, forming arsenious acid, which will remain in solution; while the chief product of the decomposition of the antimoniuretted hydrogen will be argentic antimonide, which will deposit In the case of arseniuretted hydrogen, the reaction is: --6AgN03 + 3H20 + AsH3 = 6HN03 + H3AsOs + 3 Ag2. With the antimoniuretted hydrogen, the following decomposition occurs: --3AgN03 + SbH3 = 3HN03 + Ag3Sb. Another very marked distinction consists in the fact, that while arseniuretted hydrogen is evolved on adding arsenical solution to a heated mixture of zinc and solution of potassium hydrate, it is not possible to produce antimouiuretted hydrogen in that way. This is sometimes attributed to the fact that the antimony compounds are thrown down in an insoluble form by the action of the alkali, and so it is prevented from combining with the nascent hydrogen; but the true explanation is doubtless to be found in the much greater stability possessed by the oxides of antimony over those of arsenic. When arseniuretted hydrogen is passed into a solution of a cupric salt, it deposits cupric arsenide: --6CuS04 + 4AsH3 = 6H2S04+2Cu3As2. It acts generally as a reducing agent; and when passed into a mercuric solution it produces the corresponding mercurous salt, and deposits metallic arsenic: --6HgCl2 + 2AsH3 = 3Hg2Cl3 + 6HC1 + As2. In addition to the gaseous compound just described,show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 204 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 372g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236620925
  • 9781236620927