Introd. Additions and Corrections. the Origin of the English Drama. the Beginnings of the English Regular Drama. Shakespere's Predecessors. Shakspere. Ben Jonson

Introd. Additions and Corrections. the Origin of the English Drama. the Beginnings of the English Regular Drama. Shakespere's Predecessors. Shakspere. Ben Jonson

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ...natural sphere, even through the veil of versions which were perversions, and of adaptations which were a compound of mutilations and Procrustean extensions'. On the stage this method of treating Shakspere continued long after the theatre had ceased to be the sole means of keeping alive his fame, and after he had once more been enabled, if I may use the expression, to speak for himself. A few names of these adaptations will suflice. The Yew of Venice made his appearance on the stage at Lincoln's Inn Fields in 1701, in a version of Shakspere's play (which was printed) by George Granville, afterwards Lord Lansdowne. 'Granville the Polite' left out the characters of Launcelot and Old Gobbo, and introduced a 'Masque of Peleus and Thetis, ' during which Shylock, supping at a separate table, drinks a toast to his lady-love Money." Measure for Measzcentsre, on which D'Avenant had already tried his hand, 1 Measure for Measure and Much Ado about Nothing were amalgamated by D'Avenant into a single tragi-comedy called The Law against L01/ers. It was he who conceived the idea, which he left to Dryden to execute, of increasing the etiectiveness of The Tempest (or The Enchanted Island, for the title too was double-necked) by a process of reduplication which no words can characterise. To the maiden who had never beheld a man now corresponded a youth who had never set eyes on a woman. Ariel too was provided with a female double (Milcha), and Caliban likewise (Sycorax); and Miranda received a younger sister Dorinda, the object of which character was to furnish an oblique counterpart of Miranda, though I think that the scope of Dryden's intention has been unnecessarily exaggerated. The plashow more

Product details

  • Paperback | 248 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 449g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236928504
  • 9781236928504