Interstate Commerce Commission Reports; Decisions of the Interstate Commerce Commission Volume N . 21

Interstate Commerce Commission Reports; Decisions of the Interstate Commerce Commission Volume N . 21

By (author) 

List price: US$40.19

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...touching upon questions of immediate interest is here inserted: Mr. Herrin. Should a railroad company in your opinion voluntarily take business where there is no competitive force operating; should it take business at less than a compensatory rate, full compensatory rate? Would you voluntarily put in these rates if there was no water competition between San Francisco and New York? Mr. Morton. I do not think we would. Mr. Herrin. You would not voluntarily make these low rates? Mr. Morton. Water competition is the controlling force. Mr. Herrin. That forces you to either take the business at those rates or not take it at all? Mr. Morton. Yes, sir. Mr. Herrin. Well, as a matter of policy should a carrier take any business at less than a compensatory rate where it is not compelled to do it, where there is no competitive force? Mr. Morton. In many cases we do it to encourage an industry or to in some way provide for future benefits. Mr. Herrin. But as a general rule? That would be the exception to the general rule? Mr. Morton. It is all done for selfish motives. Mr. Herrin. For what? Mr. Morton. For selfish motives--either from some benefit to be obtained at once or in the future. Mr. Herrin. You could not put your rates, could you, on the basis of the rate from New York to San Francisco--reduce all your intermediates to that basis or less? Mr. Morton. I think it would be a very great hardship if we had to do that. Mr. Herrin. As a financial proposition, you are compelled to maintain the present intermediate rate, or something near that? Mr. Morton. We think so. Mr. Herrtn. Is there any case of graded rates where the rate from Chicago to San Francisco is no more than your proportion of the through rate from New York? Mr. Morton. I do not think so. Mr....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 326 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 17mm | 585g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236590775
  • 9781236590770