A International Wireless Telegraphy; Hearing Before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Sixty-Second Congress, on an International Wireless Telegraphy Convention, with Service Regulations Annexed Thereto

A International Wireless Telegraphy; Hearing Before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, Sixty-Second Congress, on an International Wireless Telegraphy Convention, with Service Regulations Annexed Thereto

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1912 edition. Excerpt: ...Does not much of that lack of definiteness grow out of the mischievous interference with the working of this system? Ought not that to be regulated somewhat by statute? I think I recall that the other day some one said before the Committee on Commerce that even a ship was ordered out to sea to look out for a wreck when it was simply a false message--there had been no wreck at all. It seems as if there was a certain indefiniteness of regulation that is operating disadvantageously. Rear Admiral Edwards. Lieut. John Q, Walton, chief constructor of the United States Revenue-Cutter Service, testified to the fact that one of the revenue cutters started out on a mission of help in response to a false message. I understand, however, that the conscience of the amateur prompted him to recall the ship shortly after she started on her trip. Senator Hitchcock. You say that there is a 19-cent total charge from the ship to the shore, of which the ship receives 7 cents and the coastal station 12 cents. Rear Admiral Edwards. Yes, sir. Senator Hitchcock. When that message is received at a coastal station is that coastal station under obligation to forward? Suppose it is required to be done by the Western Union? Is the Western Union required to accept it without being prepaid? Rear Admiral Edwards. I do not understand that the telegraph companies are required to accept any message. Article 9 of the service regulations states that if the route of a wireless telegram is partly over telegraph lines built within the confines of a noncontracting Government to the treaty, like certain portions of Africa Senator Hitchcock. Suppose you send it to the United States? Rear Admiral Edwards. In that case the sending blank might contain one more restriction than it now contains....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236564596
  • 9781236564597