International Library of Technology; A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in the Engineering Professions and Trades, or for Those Who Desire Information Concerning Them Volume 57

International Library of Technology; A Series of Textbooks for Persons Engaged in the Engineering Professions and Trades, or for Those Who Desire Information Concerning Them Volume 57

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1905 edition. Excerpt: ...country, and the guild of most importance in oriental countries was that of the dyers. The dyers were divided into different classes according to the colors they could dye, and they lived in colonies regulated by the convenience of water facilities in applying their craft. The dyes were applied by dipping the skeins of yarn in successive solutions alternately, and not by mixing the dyes to form a color as in modern times. The exact method of doing this was one of the guild secrets, as was also the length of time it should hang in the sun to dry and soften. There are no books of recipe for these dyes, but each dyer has a mental list of various shades that he can compound at a moment's notice in order to satisfy the demand. The skill of these dyers can be judged when we understand that one of them, blindfolded, can run his hands over a rug and describe the pattern accurately from the feeling of the different colors in the wool, so familiar is he with the effect of the dyes on the fabric. The imitation of the ancient dyes by the modern products of coal tar has degenerated the rug industry materially, as has also the demand in Europe and America for oriental fabrics, and the Wilton rug woven on the loom is in many respects preferable to what are apparently genuine oriental fabrics, but which are in reality cheaper imitations of the ancient goods woven expressly to sell in European and American markets. In many new fabrics that come from out-of-the-way parts of the Orient, the dyes and wool are found to be thoroughly up to the old standard, but the majority of importations are sadly inferior to what we are led to believe is the characteristic quality of an oriental rug. The reputation of Persia rested on its rugs, and there was at one time a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 82 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 163g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236958799
  • 9781236958792