The International Library of Famous Literature; Selected from the World's Great Writers, Ancient, Medieaval, and Modern, with Biographical and Explanatory Notes and Critical Essays by Many Eminent Writers Volume 12

The International Library of Famous Literature; Selected from the World's Great Writers, Ancient, Medieaval, and Modern, with Biographical and Explanatory Notes and Critical Essays by Many Eminent Writers Volume 12

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ...to the signet, and held an appointment in the Court of Session as the colleague of Sir Walter Scott. Miss Ferrier was one of the leading lights in the literary society of her native city, and a frequent visitor at Abbotsford, the residence of Scott. Her principal novels are: "Marriage" (1818), "The Inheritance" (1824), and "Destiny" (1831). "Miss Pratt, by means of great-grandfathers and greatgrandmothers (who, par parenthise, may commonly be classed under the head of great bores), is, somehow or other, cousin to all families of distinction, in general, throughout Scotland. I cannot pretend to show forth the various modifications of which cousinship is susceptible, first, second, and third degrees, as far as numbers and degrees can go. And, indeed, I have alreadycommitted a great error in my outset by having introduced Miss Pratt by herself Miss Pratt, when I ought to have presented her as Miss Pratt and Anthony Whyte. In fact, as Whittington without his cat would be nobody in the nursery, so neither would Miss Pratt be recognized in the world without Anthony Whyte. Not that there exists the same reciprocal attachment, or unity of fortune, between the aiirit and the nephew which distinguished the master and his cat; for Anthony Whyte is1 rich, and Miss Pratt is poor;--Anthony Whyte lives in a castle, Miss Pratt in a cottage;--Anthony Whyte has horses and hounds, Miss Pratt has clogs and pattens. There is something so uninteresting, if not unpromising, in the name that"--addressing himself to Miss St. Clair--"you, at present, will scarcely care whether it belongs to a man or a cat, and will be ready to exclaim, 'What's in a name? But do not expect long to enjoy this happy state of indifference: ...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 354g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236888022
  • 9781236888020