Interior Ballistics with a Short Treatment of the More Common High Explosives Prepared as a Text Book & for Practical Use by Lieut. J.H. Glennon

Interior Ballistics with a Short Treatment of the More Common High Explosives Prepared as a Text Book & for Practical Use by Lieut. J.H. Glennon

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ...that the rate of evolution of powder gas should decrease as little as possible (an increase is desirable), in order that the pressure may be kept up till the projectile reaches the muzzle. The smaller, then, the value of X, the better the shape. Supposing that during combustion all grains retain their general shape, then: The sphere or cube is the worst among the regular forms; the flat parallelopiped is better than the long or pencil form; the quill or macaroni form is the exact equivalent of the large thin disc perforated at the centre, the length of grain in one case being the difference of the radii in the other. Powder grains may be classified according to the number of decreasing dimensions. The sphere and parallelopiped have three diminishing dimensions. The pierced cylinder has only two; along with it may be classed the long, pencil-shaped grain (parallelopiped or cylinder), the length being affected very little, as a factor, in comparison with width and thickness, so that we need consider but two diminishing dimensions. The very long pierced cylinder has practically but one decreasing dimension, the small proportional decrease in length being neglected; the thin perforated disc of large difference between external and internal radii, the thin unperforated disc of large diameter, and the flat parallelopiped of large sides (linear) follow the same rule. In the case of three diminishing dimensions, terms involving a, X, and p occur in the expression for the portion of grain burned. Where, among the regular forms, there are but two decreasing dimensions, a and X alone occur, and where there is but one, a only. 64. Number of Grains per Pound.--The number of grains to the pound is evidently the reciprocal of the weight in pounds of one grain....show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 38 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 86g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236631293
  • 9781236631299