Intemperance Considered in Relation to Its Cause and Cure; Or, a Defence of the Principle and Practice of Total Abstinence from Intoxicating Liquors

Intemperance Considered in Relation to Its Cause and Cure; Or, a Defence of the Principle and Practice of Total Abstinence from Intoxicating Liquors

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1850 edition. Excerpt: ...imply the offering of intoxicating liquors to others, neither do the principles of moderate drinking absolutely imply that a man will even drink moderately; because, if it is alleged that a man may reserve to himself the right to give intoxicating liquors to others, but that it does not follow that he will do so, it may be equally affirmed on behalf of those who refuse to become abstainers, that it does not follow that they intend to drink, that it is only a liberty reserved to do so, which may never be exercised. If we are to regard personal abstinence, therefore, as a cure for intemperance, we may do the same to moderate drinking; for the moderate drinker may compare his own moral uniformity with the light and shade of this kind df tee-total morality, and be able to draw a conclusion to his own advantage. It has been asserted by real personal abstainers, as distinguished from those who act upon total abstinence principles, but still sympathize with mere personal abstinence, that the latter is by far the best mode of suppressing intemperance. And they endeavour to show that their plan is preferable to total abstinence; because they say that no man has a right to think for another, and that in one man refusing to give intoxicating liquors to another he is thinking for him, in fact coercing him to abstain, in so far as he refuses to enable him to get what he wants, or at least refuses to give it to him, and what the other individual may not be prepared to admit there is any harm in taking. Now, this objection proceeds altogether upon an erroneous assumption. In the first place, it overlooks the fact that there is no moral obligation resting upon any one to give intoxicating liquors to another. It is true, that the drinking customs and laws of...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 44 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 95g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236658272
  • 9781236658272