Instructions for Traction and Stationary Engineers; A Book of Instruction and Reference for Traction and Stationary Engineers, with Questions and Answers, Useful Tables, and Rules

Instructions for Traction and Stationary Engineers; A Book of Instruction and Reference for Traction and Stationary Engineers, with Questions and Answers, Useful Tables, and Rules

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1906 edition. Excerpt: ...will cause a loss of power due to the fact that the piston will need to be forced against the pressure by the momentum of the fly wheel. This will have the same effect as applying a brake to the fly wheel. It is also liable to cause pounding on this account. If an engine has too much lead, it is quite likely that the exhaust port will open too early to obtain the best results from the expansion of the steam in the cvlinder. If an engine has too little lead, not enough steam will be admitted to the cylinder to cushion the piston as it reaches the end of the stroke, and it is liable to "pound" in the crosshead or crank pin, and sufficient steam will not be adrnitted to the cylinder during the first part of the stroke of the engine. When an engine has too little lead, there is also danger that the exhaust port will not open early enough. Dead Center. In setting the slide-valve on a steam engine, it is very necessary that the engine be placed on the dead center when the valve is adjusted. An engine is said to he on the dead center when the piston is at the end of its stroke, or when the center of the wrist pin, the center of the crank pin, and the center of the main shaft are all in a straight line. The crank passes two dead centers in each revolution. If the engine has the proper amount of lead, steam is admitted to the cylinder when it is on the dead center, but the engine will not start when it is on the dead center, as the pressure on the piston will be pushing or pulling directly against the crank shaft. Locomotives. hoisting engines, and other engines, are often made with two cylinders and cranks connected to the same shaft, one crank a quarter of a revolution ahead of the other in order to always have one crank off the dead...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236932714
  • 9781236932716