Institutes of Ecclesiastical History, Ancient and Modern; In Four Books, Much Corrected, Enlarged, and Improved from the Primary Authorities Volume 3

Institutes of Ecclesiastical History, Ancient and Modern; In Four Books, Much Corrected, Enlarged, and Improved from the Primary Authorities Volume 3

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...human affairs; that is, such a God as Christianity presents to us for our worship. The Jesuits maintain the latter; for they contend, that these names were used by the ancient Chinese philosophers, (who they think, had just ideas of natural religion), to denote very clearly such a God as the Christians worship: and therefore, they would not prohibit their converts from continuing to use those terms in their prayers and discourses, to designate the supreme Being; nay, they used them constantly themselves to denote the true God. But their adversaries maintain the contrary opinion; and contend, that the ancient philosophy of the Chinese was full of impiety, and made no distinction between God the divine Spirit, and nature or the material world. They assert moreover, that Confucius himself, whom the Chinese hold in the highest veneration, was a stranger to religion and piety, and one who supposed that all existing things arose necessarily into being in the course of nature. This disagreement gave rise to very learned discussions concerning the customs, laws, and opinions of the ancient Chinese; which discussions have indeed made us acquainted with many things that were previously not well understood, but they have not decided the point for which they were undertaken. It seems that entire assent is not to be given either to the positions of the Jesuits, or to those of their adversaries; and that the Tien of the ancient Chinese, was indeed far inferior in his attributes to the God of Christians, and yet was something different from the visible heavens or the air. 14. The ancient laws of China require the people, annually, at stated seasons, to honour their deceased ancestors, with certain ceremonies which seem to be of a religious nature; and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 348 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 18mm | 621g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236528360
  • 9781236528360