Insight and Psychosis

Insight and Psychosis

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Description

The cornerstone of any psychiatric evaluation, the mental status exam, requires an assessment of insight - a term commonly employed by clinicians to describe a patient's awareness (or lack thereof) of having a mental disorder. However, the term has become riddled with conceptual ambiguities. This book takes a multidisciplinary approach in order to examine faithfully the nature and significance of insight.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 384 pages
  • 160.02 x 238.76 x 33.02mm | 771.1g
  • Oxford University Press Inc
  • New York, United States
  • English
  • line figures, tables
  • 0195084977
  • 9780195084979

Review quote

"Some books are memorable for the way in which they clarify a subject, assembling an array of seemingly unrelated facts into a coherent whole. Other books make their mark by unpacking the complexities of a topic that turns out to be more intricate then [sic] we had ever suspected. Insight and Psychosis falls in this latter group. . . . At a certain point in its development, a field is ripe for the kind of grand synthesis that shatters old paradigms and establishes new ones. The study of insight has not yet reached that stage. But the analytic approaches presented in this volume, cumulated over time, are the surest path toward the goal of convincingly explicating this complex and important phenomenon."--Psychiatric Services"Students, as well as seasoned professionals, will appreciate the multiple perspectives, the development of the concept of insight and the delineation of its clinical implications brought together in one volume."--Readings"The book is divided into five sections . . . Part I deals broadly with phenomenology. . . . Part II concentrates on models which may help to explain the aetiology of lack of insight. . . . Parts III and IV are concerned with social and behavioural aspects of the problem. . . . Part V deals with the clinical implications of impaired insight, highlighting again its association with poor treatment compliance. Here there is a satisfying shift from academic considerations to firmly practical measures. . . . In brief, this book can be highly commended as a landmark publication in a hitherto much neglected field. It presents a stimulating mix of theory, systematic research and basic clinical observation, and illustrates well the contribution of the new breed of clinician/neuroscientist to the advancement of understanding in a difficult and important arena. This work will doubtless become the major reference book for those working in the field for quite some time."--Cognitive Neuropsychiatry "Some books are memorable for the way in which they clarify a subject, assembling an array of seemingly unrelated facts into a coherent whole. Other books make their mark by unpacking the complexities of a topic that turns out to be more intricate then [sic] we had ever suspected. Insight and Psychosis falls in this latter group. . . . At a certain point in its development, a field is ripe for the kind of grand synthesis that shatters old paradigms and establishes new ones. The study of insight has not yet reached that stage. But the analytic approaches presented in this volume, cumulated over time, are the surest path toward the goal of convincingly explicating this complex and important phenomenon."--Psychiatric Services"Students, as well as seasoned professionals, will appreciate the multiple perspectives, the development of the concept of insight and the delineation of its clinical implications brought together in one volume."--Readings"The book is divided into five sections . . . Part I deals broadly with phenomenology. . . . Part II concentrates on models which may help to explain the aetiology of lack of insight. . . . Parts III and IV are concerned with social and behavioural aspects of the problem. . . . Part V deals with the clinical implications of impaired insight, highlighting again its association with poor treatment compliance. Here there is a satisfying shift from academic considerations to firmly practical measures. . . . In brief, this book can be highly commended as a landmark publication in a hitherto much neglected field. It presents a stimulating mix of theory, systematic research and basic clinical observation, and illustrates well the contribution of the new breed of clinician/neuroscientist to the advancement of understanding in a difficult and important arena. This work will doubtless become the major reference book for those working in the field for quite some time."--Cognitive Neuropsychiatry "Some books are memorable for the way in which they clarify a subject, assembling an array of seemingly unrelated facts into a coherent whole. Other books make their mark by unpacking the complexities of a topic that turns out to be more intricate then [sic] we had ever suspected. Insight and Psychosis falls in this latter group. . . . At a certain point in its development, a field is ripe for the kind of grand synthesis that shatters old paradigms and establishes new ones. The study of insight has not yet reached that stage. But the analytic approaches presented in this volume, cumulated over time, are the surest path toward the goal of convincingly explicating this complex and important phenomenon."--Psychiatric Services "Students, as well as seasoned professionals, will appreciate the multiple perspectives, the development of the concept of insight and the delineation of its clinical implications brought together in one volume."--Readings "The book is divided into five sections . . . Part I deals broadly with phenomenology. . . . Part II concentrates on models which may help to explain the aetiology of lack of insight. . . . Parts III and IV are concerned with social and behavioural aspects of the problem. . . . Part V deals with the clinical implications of impaired insight, highlighting again its association with poor treatment compliance. Here there is a satisfying shift from academic considerations to firmly practical measures. . . . In brief, this book can be highly commended as a landmark publication in a hitherto much neglected field. It presents a stimulating mix of theory, systematic research and basic clinical observation, and illustrates well the contributionof the new breed of clinician/neuroscientist to the advancement of understanding in a difficult and important arena. This work will doubtless become the major reference book for those working in the field for quite some time."--Cognitive Neuropsychiatry "Some books are memorable for the way in which they clarify a subject, assembling an array of seemingly unrelated facts into a coherent whole. Other books make their mark by unpacking the complexities of a topic that turns out to be more intricate then [sic] we had ever suspected. Insight and Psychosis falls in this latter group. . . . At a certain point in its development, a field is ripe for the kind of grand synthesis that shatters old paradigms and establishes new ones. The study of insight has not yet reached that stage. But the analytic approaches presented in this volume, cumulated over time, are the surest path toward the goal of convincingly explicating this complex and important phenomenon."--Psychiatric Services "Students, as well as seasoned professionals, will appreciate the multiple perspectives, the development of the concept of insight and the delineation of its clinical implications brought together in one volume."--Readings "The book is divided into five sections . . . Part I deals broadly with phenomenology. . . . Part II concentrates on models which may help to explain the aetiology of lack of insight. . . . Parts III and IV are concerned with social and behavioural aspects of the problem. . . . Part V deals with the clinical implications of impaired insight, highlighting again its association with poor treatment compliance. Here there is a satisfying shift from academic considerations to firmly practical measures. . . . In brief, this book can be highly commended as a landmark publication in a hitherto much neglected field. It presents a stimulating mix of theory, systematic research and basic clinicalobservation, and illustrates well the contribution of the new breed of clinician/neuroscientist to the advancement of understanding in a difficult and important arena. This work will doubtless become the major reference book for those working in the field for quite some time."--Cognitive Neuropsychiatry "Some books are memorable for the way in which they clarify a subject, assembling an array of seemingly unrelated facts into a coherent whole. Other books make their mark by unpacking the complexities of a topic that turns out to be more intricate then [sic] we had ever suspected. Insight andPsychosis falls in this latter group. . . . At a certain point in its development, a field is ripe for the kind of grand synthesis that shatters old paradigms and establishes new ones. The study of insight has not yet reached that stage. But the analytic approaches presented in this volume, cumulated over time, are the surest path toward the goal of convincingly explicating this complex and important phenomenon."--Psychiatric Services"Students, as well as seasoned professionals, will appreciate the multiple perspectives, the development of the concept of insight and the delineation of its clinical implications brought together in one volume."--Readings "The book is divided into five sections . . . Part I deals broadly with phenomenology. . . . Part II concentrates on models which may help to explain the aetiology of lack of insight. . . . Parts III and IV are concerned with social and behavioural aspects of the problem. . . . Part V deals withthe clinical implications of impaired insight, highlighting again its association with poor treatment compliance. Here there is a satisfying shift from academic considerations to firmly practical measures. . . . In brief, this book can be highly commended as a landmark publication in a hitherto muchneglected field. It presents a stimulating mix of theory, systematic research and basic clinical observation, and illustrates well thecontribution of the new breed of clinician/neuroscientist to the advancement of understanding in a difficult and important arena. This work will doubtless become themajor reference book for those working in the field for quite some time."--Cognitive Neuropsychiatryshow more

Table of contents

Foreword; Introduction; PART I: PHENOMENOLOGY OF INSIGHT; 1. The Description and Meaning of Insight in Psychosis; 2. Insight in the Psychoses: A Conceptual History; 3. Completing Kraepelin's Psychopathology: Insight, Delusion, and the Phenomenology of Illness; 4. Insight and Delusions; 5. The Subjective Experience of Negative Symptoms; 6. Insight, Self Deception, and Psychosis in Mood Disorders; PART II: NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF INSIGHT; 7. Neurobehavioral Disorders of Awareness and Their Relevance to Schizophrenia; 8. The Neurobiology of Disturbances of the Self: Autonoetic Agnosia in Schizophrenia; 9. Representations in Consciousness and the Neuropsychology of Insight; PART III: CULTURE AND INSIGHT; 10. Inside Knowledge: Cultural Constructions of Insight in Psychosis; 11. Japanese Attitudes Towards Insight in Psychosis; PART IV INSIGHT AND BEHAVIOR; 12. Delusions, Action, and Insight; 13. Violent Behavior by Individuals with Serious Mental Illness; PART V: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS FOR POOR INSIGHT; 14. The Relationship Between Insight into Psychosis and Compliance with Medications; 15. Impaired Insight in Schizophrenia: Advances From Psychosocial Treatment Research; 16. Insight, Families, and Education: An Exploration of the Role of Attribution to Clinical Outcome; 17. The Clinical Importance of Insight: An Overview; Epilogue; Indexshow more