An Inquiry Into the Prevailing Notions of the Freedom of Will; Which Is Supposed to Be Essential to Moral Agency, Virtue and Vice, Reward and Punishment, Praise and Blame

An Inquiry Into the Prevailing Notions of the Freedom of Will; Which Is Supposed to Be Essential to Moral Agency, Virtue and Vice, Reward and Punishment, Praise and Blame

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1845 edition. Excerpt: ...obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name above every name." Psal. xlv. 7, " Thou lovest righteousness, and hatest wickedness; therefore God, thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows." There is no room to pretend that the glorious benefits bestowed in consequence of Christ's obedience, are not properly of the nature of a reward. What is a reward, in the most proper sense, but a benefit bestowed in consequence of something morally excellent in quality or behaviour, in testimony of well-pleasedness in that moral excellency, and respect and favour on that account? If we consider the nature of a reward most strictly, and make the utmost of it, and add to the things contained in this description proper merit or worthiness, and the bestowment of the benefit in consequence of a promise; still it will be found there is nothing belonging to it, but that the Scripture is most express as to its belonging to the glory bestowed on Christ after his sufferings, as appears from what has been already observed; there was a glorious benefit bestowed in consequence of something morally excellent, being called righteousness and obedience; there was great favour, love, and wellpleasedness, for this righteousness and obedience, in the bestower; there was proper merit, or worthiness of the benefit, in the obedience; it was bestowed in fulfilment of promises made to that obedience; and was bestowed tlzerejbre, or because he had performed that obedience. I may add to all these things, that Jesus Christ, while here in the flesh, was manifestly in a state of trial. The last Adam, as Christ is called, 1 Cor. xv. 45; Rom. v. 14, taking on him...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 120 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 6mm | 227g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236955587
  • 9781236955586