Inquiry Into Occupation and Administration of Haiti and Santo Domingo; Hearings Before a Select Committee on Haiti and Santo Domingo, United States Senate, Sixty-Seventh Congress, First and Second Sessions, Pursuant to S. Res. 112

Inquiry Into Occupation and Administration of Haiti and Santo Domingo; Hearings Before a Select Committee on Haiti and Santo Domingo, United States Senate, Sixty-Seventh Congress, First and Second Sessions, Pursuant to S. Res. 112

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1922 edition. Excerpt: ...be instantly removed and full control turned over to Dominicans at once and without any restrictions. One enthusiastic speaker at-Santiago suggested wringing the neck of the American eagle and throwing the carcass in the dust. Others claimed that the method of calling the elections was unconstitutional and that it would not do to have an election as long as the marines were in the country. In order properly to evaluate this protest, we shall have to consider what was taking place behind the scenes. Let us begin at Washington. Whatever the new administration thought of Mr. Wilson's policy, to just the extent that it disagreed, it would be careful 11ot to make further blunders. Inasmuch as the United States could care nothing about the specific details of the plan for removing the military forces, it must have sought to secure certain things which it considered fundamental. Naturally it would discuss the plan with prominent Dominicans. Of these there was a committee at Washington headed by ex-President Henriquez y Carvajal. It is natural to assume that they told the State Department that the proposed plan was fairly satisfactory and would be accepted by the Dominicans. One of them-told me that such was the case. Naturally, therefore, when the plan as issued was opposed there was no reason to change it for what assurance could be given that another plan would be more acceptable. Native opposition.---I have reason to believe that the plan. in general outline at least, was known to the Dominican press and politicians in advance of publication. It was decided to reject it; hence, when issued, the opposition was already prepared. I suspect that some of this grew out of a desire to make impossible the later election.of Henriquez y Carvajal...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 714 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 36mm | 1,252g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236762428
  • 9781236762429