An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sleep and Death; With a View to Ascertain the More Immediate Causes of Death, and the Better Regulation of the Means of Obviating Them. Being the Concluding Part of the Author's Experimental Inquiry Into the

An Inquiry Into the Nature of Sleep and Death; With a View to Ascertain the More Immediate Causes of Death, and the Better Regulation of the Means of Obviating Them. Being the Concluding Part of the Author's Experimental Inquiry Into the

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1834 edition. Excerpt: ...is now prepared to consider those parts of the subject which embrace a view of all the powers of the living animal, and form the proper subject of this volume, the nature of Sleep and Death.. las VI. On the Nature of Sleep. From the Philosophical Transactions for 1833. Of all sciences Physiology is most exposed to causes of inaccuracy. The subjects of experiment are here the most complicated, and the phenomena at once the most varied, and bearing the least resemblance to those we are accustomed to contemplate. Hence it is that the groundless theories of our predecessors have been succeeded by the erroneous inferences of modern times, and the student is bewildered by contradictory evidence, until the conclusion is often forced on him, that, with the exception of some of the great outlines which have been established by such evidence as cannot be questioned, the subject is from its nature too perplexed to admit of a clear and satisfactory exposition. It will readily be admitted by those who are accustomed to contemplate the works of nature, that such a result is less the fault of the subject than the mode of investigating it; for although physiology is not a demonstrative science, it is as open to observation and experiment as any other; but greater caution in our inferences is required, in proportion as the sources of error are more numerous and less easily detected. If the attempt to free some parts of this science from the confusion in which it has been involved, should expose me to the charge of presumption, because it can only be done by judging the labours of others, I have at least the apology of the necessity of the task, and of not a short life, in a great degree devoted to the subject; for although it is not more than twenty years since I...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 54 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 113g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123665952X
  • 9781236659521