An Inland Voyage. Travels with a Donkey. the Amateur Emigrant. the Silverado Squatters. Across the Plains, with Other Memories and Essays. the Silver

An Inland Voyage. Travels with a Donkey. the Amateur Emigrant. the Silverado Squatters. Across the Plains, with Other Memories and Essays. the Silver

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1915 edition. Excerpt: ... he was far from bold, but seemed to woo in spite of himself, and with a soft and pleading eye. Ragged as he was, and many a scarecrow is in that respect more comfortably furnished, even on board he was not without some curious admirers. There was a girl among the passengers, a tall, blond, handsome, strapping Irishwoman, with a wild, accommodating eye, whom Alick had dubbed Tommy, with that transcendental appropriateness that defies analysis. One day the Devonian was lying for warmth in the upper stokehole, which stands open on the deck, when Irish Tommy came past, very neatly attired, as was her custom. "Poor fellow," she said, stopping, "you haven't a ves." "No," he said; "I wish I 'ad." Then she stood and gazed on him in silence, until, in his embarrassment, for he knew not how to look under this scrutiny, he pulled out his pipe and began to fill it with tobacco. "Do you want a match?" she asked. And before he had time to reply, she ran off and presently returned with more than one. That was the beginning and the end, as far as our passage is concerned, of what Iwill make bold to call this love-affair. There are many relations which go on to marriage and last during a lifetime, in which less human feeling is engaged than in this scene of five minutes at the stoke-hole. Rigidly speaking, this would end the chapter of the stowaways; but in a larger sense of the word I have yet more to add. Jones had discovered and pointed out to me a young woman who was remarkable among her fellows for a pleasing and interesting air. She was poorly clad, to the verge, if not over the line, of disrespectability, with a ragged old jacket and a bit of a sealskin cap no bigger than your...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 318g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236907922
  • 9781236907929