Infant Education; Or, Practical Remarks on the Importance of Educating the Infant Poor, from the Age of Eighteen Months to Seven Years, Containing Hints for Developing the Moral and Intellectual Powers of Children of All Classes. - By S.

Infant Education; Or, Practical Remarks on the Importance of Educating the Infant Poor, from the Age of Eighteen Months to Seven Years, Containing Hints for Developing the Moral and Intellectual Powers of Children of All Classes. - By S.

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...and when they do, it is turned to no other account than merely for the walk. So much are they rivetted to books, and confined to rooms, that it has never entered the mind of many masters to teach by things instead of books; and yet no one will deny, that the wide world furnishes plenty of lessons, and that many of the objects in nature would prove the best of books, if they were but read--but no, this is not the custom. Give a child a book into his hand, and let him addle his brain over it for two or three hours, and if he does not learn his task set him down for a blockhead; never mind whether he understands the subject. If he does not learn his task, flog him. No questions allowed by any means. Nothing can be greater impertinence, than for children to desire explanation; let them find it out as well as they can. This is part of the old system; but will it be argued that this is the best method to cultivate and treat the human mind? May I hope to be excused when I say, that I think, if only one half the pains were taken to break in, train, and exercise the infant poor, that is taken with gentlemen's horses and dogs, we should very soon sensibly feel its effects. Of all the causes which conspire to render the life of man short and miserable, no one has greater influence than the want of proper exercise. Healthy parents, wholesome food, and proper clothing, will avail little where exercise is neglected; sufficient exercise will counterbalance several defects in nursing, but nothing can supply the want of it. It is absolutely necessary to the health, the growth, and the strength of children. The desire of exercise is coeval with life itself. Were this principle attended to, many diseases might be prevented; but while indolence and sedentary...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 86 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236569792
  • 9781236569790