The Industrial Revolution; Being the Parts Entitled Parliamentary Colbertism and Laissez Faire, Reprinted from the Growth of English Industry and Commerce in Modern Times

The Industrial Revolution; Being the Parts Entitled Parliamentary Colbertism and Laissez Faire, Reprinted from the Growth of English Industry and Commerce in Modern Times

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 edition. Excerpt: ... only able to infer the progress of capitalism from incidental occurrences. The / trace nature of the difficulties and disputes, which arise in a trade, kan e aremay serve to show whether the labourers were wage-earners or not; and the character of the associations4 which existed among them, may often give us a suggestion as to the con-and trade dition of the workmen at some date'. It is, for the most 1 The employers sometimes owned the looms, as well, 2 and 3 P. and M. c. 11. 9 This term is used in the sense in which it was current in Yorkshire at the beginning of the nineteenth century (Reports, 1806, m. 1058, printed pag. 444), Mr Unwin (Industrial Organisation, p. 4), defines the terms qnite differently, and opposes the gild to the domestic system, as separate and successive phases of development, bat this does not seem to me to apply in English history. I prefer to say that the domestic system existed from the earliest times till it was superseded by capitalism; the craft gilds were a form of industrial organisation which was appropriate to the domestic, rather than to the capitalist system; and that these gilds were convenient instruments for enforcing civic, as contrasted with national policy. The analogy with the agricultural change is noticeable; the yeoman farmer might often be employed as a labourer to work for a neighbour in return for wages. The inn-craft gild was appropriate) to the domestic system, but some of the mediaeval London companies were capitalist in character and so were the seventeenth century companies, generally speaking. Trade Unions, as associations of wage-earners, testify by their existence to the severance of classes; the inference to be drawn from the formation of yeoman gilds is doubtful. See...show more

Product details

  • Paperback
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 191g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236846710
  • 9781236846716