Individual Responsibility in International Law for Serious Human Rights Violations

Individual Responsibility in International Law for Serious Human Rights Violations

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Description

What rules of international law make the individual, even a Head of State, responsible for perpetrating serious human rights violations, such as war crimes, torture or genocide? This question is becoming more critical in our increasingly interdependent world, and the recent invasion of Kuwait and the brutalization of its people by Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein has heated up the debate even further.
The author argues that a new rule of international law stipulating individual responsibility for all serious human rights violations is currently emerging. To show how this is coming about, he explores relevant norms in classic laws of war, international humanitarian law and modern international human rights law and surveys patterns in their implementation. He then takes account of codification efforts of the International Law Commission, the changing position of the individual in international law, and other important developments in the context of general international law as an evolving system.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 230 pages
  • 160 x 240 x 20mm | 519.99g
  • Dordrecht, Netherlands
  • English
  • 1992 ed.
  • 0792314530
  • 9780792314530

Table of contents

Abbreviations. Table of Treaties, Table of Cases. Resolutions of UN General Assembly. I. Introduction. II. Individual Responsibility in Positive Laws of War. III. Individual Responsibility in International Human Rights Law. IV. Patterns of Implementation. V. Codification of International Responsibility. VI. The Position of the Individual in International Law. VII. Emergence of a General Rule of Individual Responsibility for Serious Human Rights Violations. Annex: Draft Code of Crimes against the Peace and Security of Mankind. Bibliography. Index.
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