Individual and Group Privacy

Individual and Group Privacy

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Description

In exploring a series of problems associated with privacy and the First Amendment, Bloustein defines individual and group privacy, distinguishing them from each other and related concepts. He also identifies the public interest in individual privacy as individual integrity or liberty, and that of group privacy as the integrity of social structure. The legal protection afforded each of these forms of privacy is illustrated at length, as is the clash between them and the constitutional guarantees of the First Amendment and the citizen's general right to know. In his final essay, Bloustein insists that the concept of group privacy is essential to a properly functioning social structure, and warns that it would be disastrous if this principle were neglected as part of an overreaction to the misuse of group confidences that characterized the Nixon era.show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 194 pages
  • 154.7 x 230.1 x 15.2mm | 326.59g
  • Taylor & Francis Inc
  • Transaction Publishers
  • Somerset, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 2nd ed.
  • 0765809664
  • 9780765809667

Review quote

-Edward Bloustein has long been an articulate defender of the right to privacy. . . . There is an existentialist passion in his argument. . . . Bloustein is an eloquent spokesman with an eloquent cause. . . . [The] sense of moral indignation evoked by invasions of privacy is tempered by a prose that avoids polemics and rhetorical excess. . . . [Provides] both analytic and moral support for future research on social change through law reform.- --Mark C. Johnson, Contemporary Sociology -A notable contribution to the emerging law of privacy... Bloustein has not only developed a unified theory of privacy but he has gone far to relate it to the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and to other features of our constitutional structure.- --Thomas Emerson, Yale Law School "Edward Bloustein has long been an articulate defender of the right to privacy. . . . There is an existentialist passion in his argument. . . . Bloustein is an eloquent spokesman with an eloquent cause. . . . [The] sense of moral indignation evoked by invasions of privacy is tempered by a prose that avoids polemics and rhetorical excess. . . . [Provides] both analytic and moral support for future research on social change through law reform." --Mark C. Johnson, Contemporary Sociology "A notable contribution to the emerging law of privacy... Bloustein has not only developed a unified theory of privacy but he has gone far to relate it to the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and to other features of our constitutional structure." --Thomas Emerson, Yale Law School "Edward Bloustein has long been an articulate defender of the right to privacy. . . . There is an existentialist passion in his argument. . . . Bloustein is an eloquent spokesman with an eloquent cause. . . . [The] sense of moral indignation evoked by invasions of privacy is tempered by a prose that avoids polemics and rhetorical excess. . . . [Provides] both analytic and moral support for future research on social change through law reform." --Mark C. Johnson, Contemporary Sociology "A notable contribution to the emerging law of privacy... Bloustein has not only developed a unified theory of privacy but he has gone far to relate it to the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and to other features of our constitutional structure." --Thomas Emerson, Yale Law School "A notable contribution to the emerging law of privacy... Bloustein has not only developed a unified theory of privacy but he has gone far to relate it to the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and to other features of our constitutional structure." --Thomas Emerson, Yale Law School "A notable contribution to the emerging law of privacy... Bloustein has not only developed a unified theory of privacy but he has gone far to relate it to the First Amendment right to freedom of expression and to other features of our constitutional structure."--Thomas Emerson, Yale Law Schoolshow more

About Edward J. Bloustein

Edward J. Bloustein (1925-1989) was president of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey from 1971 until his death in 1989, where he also served as professor of law and philosophy. Bloustein was also a professor of law at New York University. Nathaniel J. Pallone, who served in the Bloustein administration, is University Distinguished Professor (Psychology), Center for Alcohol Studies, at Rutgers - The State University of New Jersey. He is the author of Criminal Behavior as well as a number of other books in the area of criminology, many of them published by Transaction.show more