The Indian Tribes of the United States; Their History Antiquities, Customs, Religion, Arts, Language, Traditions, Oral Legends, and Myths Volume 2

The Indian Tribes of the United States; Their History Antiquities, Customs, Religion, Arts, Language, Traditions, Oral Legends, and Myths Volume 2

By (author) 

List price: US$30.34

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1884 edition. Excerpt: ... train despatched from it. To rid the Niagara Valley of this annoyance and open the route to Schlosser, a detachment of ninety men was directed to scour the surrounding country. Owing to the inconsiderate ardor of the officer in command, and also to his ignorance of Indian subtlety in time of war, the detachment was decoyed into an ambuscade, in which he and all his men, with the exception of three or four, were killed. CHAPTER VII. EXPEDITIONS OP BOUQUET AND BRADSTREET--PACIFICATION OP THE TRIBESDEATH OF PONTIAC. The campaign of 1763 had the effect rather to inspire than to depress the hopes of the Indians. The English forces had been withdrawn to further projects ot conquest in the West Indies, thus leaving but few troops on the frontiers. Forts Pitt and Detroit had for many months been closely invested by the tribes, who completely debarred ingress and egress. The determination evinced by the forces of Pontiac at Detroit, his attacks on the shipping sent to its relief, the sanguinary encounter at Bloody Run, in which Dalzell was slain, and that at Bushy Run, where Colonel Bouquet was so actively opposed, together with the utter destruction of a detachment of ninety men and its officers on the Niagara portage, afforded an additional stimulus to the efforts of the Indians. These successes not only served to inflate the Indian pride, but likewise denoted a feeble military administration on the part of the British commander. General Amherst was of opinion that more vigorous action and a more comprehensive and definite plan were required for the campaign of 1764, while at the same time the ministry had crippled his powers by withdrawing nearly all his regular troops. Under these circumstances he called for aid from the colonies, determining to send...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 220 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236633458
  • 9781236633453