Indian Epic Poetry; Being the Substance of Lectures Recently Given at Oxford, with a Full Analysis of the Ramayana and the Leading Story of the Maha-B

Indian Epic Poetry; Being the Substance of Lectures Recently Given at Oxford, with a Full Analysis of the Ramayana and the Leading Story of the Maha-B

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1863 edition. Excerpt: ... Ravana, the demon-monarch of Ceylon (for whose destruction Vishnu had taken the form of Rama). The description of Ravana, in the 36th chapter of the Aranya-kanda, is as follows: This mighty demon "had ten faces, twenty arms, copper-coloured eyes, a Celebrated, at least in Sanskrit literature, as the place of exile of the Yaksha in the Meghadfita. + This custom remains unaltered to the present day. Compare Manu IV. 43: 'Let him not eat with his wife, nor look at her eating.' 1 A spot now known as Nasik, in the Bombay presidency, between Bombay and Agra. (Calcutta Review.) It was from this circumstance that Panchavati is now called Nasik (nasika). As we have before remarked, Ravana may be regarded as the Satan of the Ramayana, huge chest, and white teeth, like the young moon. His form was as a"thick cloud, or a mountain, or the god of Death with open mouth. He had all the marks of royalty; but his body bore the impress of wounds inflicted by all the divine arms in his warfare with the gods. It was scarred by the thunderbolt of Indra, by the tusks of (Indra's) elephant Airivata, and by the discus of Vishnu. His strength was so great that he could agitate the seas and split the tops of mountains. He was a breaker of all laws, and a ravisher of other men's wives. He once penetrated into Bhogavati (the serpent-capital of Patala), conquered the great serpent Vasuki, and carried off the beloved wife of Takshaka. He defeated Vaisravana (i. e. his own brother Kuvera, the god of Wealth), and carried off his self-moving chariot called Pushpaka. He devastated the divine groves of Chitra-ratha, and the gardens of the gods. Tall as a mountain-peak he stopped with his arms the sun and moon in their course, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236517652
  • 9781236517654