Index Geographicus Indicus; Being a List, Alphabetically Arranged, of the Principal Places in Her Majesty's Indian Empire, with Notes and Statements Statistical, Political, and Descriptive, of the Several Provinces and Administrations of

Index Geographicus Indicus; Being a List, Alphabetically Arranged, of the Principal Places in Her Majesty's Indian Empire, with Notes and Statements Statistical, Political, and Descriptive, of the Several Provinces and Administrations of

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1881 edition. Excerpt: ...the time of Nadir Shah. The term was originally applied by Shah Ismail to the Nikalu, Jawansher, and four other trusty Turki tribes to whom he owed his successes. But since then they have become a sort of brotherhood "much akin to the Beyyadiyah or, White Boys, of Oman, and bearing some analogy to the Mormons" (W. G. Palgrave, "Report on Province Trebizond," 1868). Those of Kabul form three divisions: the Jawansher, originally from Shisha; the Afshar, Nadir Shah, s tribe, and the Morad Khani, composed of all the other Turkis who have from time to time removed from Persia to Kabul; religion, Shiah, with secret rites; speech, Persian, and amongst themselves, Turki; are a very fine race, very fair, with an evident mixture of Iranian and Tartar blood. The Kohistanis and Siah Posh (" Highlanders" and " Black Clothes") forming the bulk of the population in Kohistan, Swat, Kafiristan, Chitral, and generally of the southern slopes of the Hindu-Rush down to the left bank of the Kabul river, are of pure Aryan stock, allied to the Kashmirians, but probably more closely to the Badakhshis and Wakhis. The Kohistanis are Moslem, the Siah Posh still mostly pagans, hence called Kafirs, or Infidels, by their neighbours, and their country Kafiristan. Their speech, of which there are ten distinct varieties (Major Tanner), is described as neo-Sanskritic, akin to Dardu and Lughmani. But it has never been critically studied, and may possibly prove to be pre-rather than neo-Sanskritic; is in any case of great philological interest, having been isolated from the kindred tongues since the eruption of Islim in the tenth century; type, regular features, blue and dark eyes, hair varying from light brown to black, broad open...
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Product details

  • Paperback | 100 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 195g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236991222
  • 9781236991225