Imperial Japan's World War Two

Imperial Japan's World War Two : 1931-1945

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Description

Gruhl's narrative makes clear why Japan's World War II aggression still touches deep emotions with East Asians and Western ex-prisoners of war, and why there is justifiable sensitivity to the way modern Japan has dealt with this legacy. Knowledge of the enormity of Japan's total war is also necessary to assess the United States' and her allies' policies toward Japan, and their reactions to its actions, extending from Manchuria in 1931 to Hiroshima in 1945. Gruhl takes the view that World War II started in 1931 when Japan, crowded and poor in raw materials but with a sense of military invincibility, saw empire as her salvation and invaded China.

Japan's imperial regime had volatile ambitions but limited resources, thus encouraging them to unleash a particularly brutal offensive against the peoples of Asia and surrounding ocean islands. Their 1931 to 1945 invasions and policies further added to Asia's pre-war woes, particularly in China, by badly disrupting marginal economies, leading to famines and epidemics. Altogether, the victims of Japan's World War Two aggression took many forms and were massive in number.

Gruhl offers a survey and synthesis of the historical literature and documentation, statistical data, as well as personal interviews and first-hand accounts to provide a comprehensive overview analysis. The sequence of diplomatic and military events leading to Pearl Harbor, as well as those leading to the U.S. decision to drop the atom bomb, are explored here as well as Japan's war crimes and postwar revisionist/apologist views regarding them. This book will be of intense interest to Asian specialists, and those concerned with human rights issues in a historical context.
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Product details

  • Hardback | 264 pages
  • 160 x 233.7 x 12.7mm | 204.12g
  • Transaction Publishers
  • Somerset, United Kingdom
  • English
  • 1, black & white illustrations
  • 0765803526
  • 9780765803528
  • 1,838,458

Table of contents

Introduction
Acknowledgments
1. Remembrance: The Matter of Representation in World War II Historiography
2. War Victims and Statistics
3. War and Peace and Imperial Japan
4. The Stage for Tragedy: From Manchuria to China to Indochina: 1931 to 1941
5. The Expanded Stage for Tragedy: Pearl Harbor, Southeast Asia, China, and the Pacific to Hiroshima, 1941-1945
6. Violent Death in China
7. Violent Death in Southeast Asia and the Indian and Pacific Islands
8. Forced Laborers, Refugees, and Privation Victims
9. The Raped, Tortured, Prisoners, and the Horrific Total
10. Devastation
11. China's Plight and Contribution to Allied Victory
12. Responsibility for War and War Crimes
13. The Bombs of August: Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Perspective
14. Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
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Review quote

-Imperial Japan's World War Two is a full and unique statement of Japanese war crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities (and, even then, Gruhl has missed a few), nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior.- --Stanley L. Falk, Journal of Military History -[T]his is a very strong collection of essays on the many different ways in which space and time are 'reconstructed' through mobile phone use. Reconstruction is not the first book to examine these issues, but it is nonetheless significant for the additional depth, detail and insight it brings to present understandings of the spatial and temporal dimensions and impacts of mobile phone use. . . . The breadth and depth of the research methods on display here are truly impressive, and this collection will form a rich and invaluable toolbox of ideas for future mobile and ICT researchers and students.- --Rowan Wilken, Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture & Policy "Imperial Japan's World War Two is a full and unique statement of Japanese war crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities (and, even then, Gruhl has missed a few), nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior." --Stanley L. Falk, Journal of Military History "[T]his is a very strong collection of essays on the many different ways in which space and time are 'reconstructed' through mobile phone use. Reconstruction is not the first book to examine these issues, but it is nonetheless significant for the additional depth, detail and insight it brings to present understandings of the spatial and temporal dimensions and impacts of mobile phone use. . . . The breadth and depth of the research methods on display here are truly impressive, and this collection will form a rich and invaluable toolbox of ideas for future mobile and ICT researchers and students." --Rowan Wilken, Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture & Policy "Imperial Japan's World War Two is a full and unique statement of Japanese war crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities (and, even then, Gruhl has missed a few), nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior." --Stanley L. Falk, Journal of Military History "[T]his is a very strong collection of essays on the many different ways in which space and time are 'reconstructed' through mobile phone use. Reconstruction is not the first book to examine these issues, but it is nonetheless significant for the additional depth, detail and insight it brings to present understandings of the spatial and temporal dimensions and impacts of mobile phone use. . . . The breadth and depth of the research methods on display here are truly impressive, and this collection will form a rich and invaluable toolbox of ideas for future mobile and ICT researchers and students." --Rowan Wilken, Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture & Policy "[Gruhl] has brought great dedication to his task. His objective is bringing forward the magnitude of suffering in China and other Asian nations is not only germane to a fuller comprehension of the war, but also is vital to understanding the continuing tensions in East Asia between the victims and a Japan that does not fully admit to the devastation meted out by it in that war."

-David Barrett, McMaster University "Gruhl, the former chief of NASA's Cost and Economic Analysis Branch, has a thesis that even American exceptionalists have to accept: war in the Pacific was at least as much about Shanghai, Nanking, and Manila as it was about Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Hiroshima. He tells the long, twisted, and brutal tale in crisp, forthright prose, buttressed by solid research. He sees racialism in the Land of the Rising Sun as analogous to its Nazi German ally's: "Militarist Japan's barbarity and violence in Asia...rivaled the Holocaust in Europe." It's worth recalling that the Japanese still routinely and officially reject and contest accusations concerning Chinese atrocities as well as other war crimes against fellow asians, who, as Hirohito wrote, apparently without irony, "Consistently cooperated with the Empire towards the emancipation of East Asia."

"-World War II Magazine"

""Imperial Japan's World War Two" is a full and unique statement of Japanese war crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities (and, even then, Gruhl has missed a few), nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior."

-Stanley L. Falk, "Journal of Military History" "a full and unique statement of Japanese ware crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities, nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on the relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior"

-Journal of Military History and World War II "a full and unique statement of Japanese ware crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities, nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on the relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior"

-Journal of Military History and World War II "[Gruhl] has brought great dedication to his task. His objective is bringing forward the magnitude of suffering in China and other Asian nations is not only germane to a fuller comprehension of the war, but also is vital to understanding the continuing tensions in East Asia between the victims and a Japan that does not fully admit to the devastation meted out by it in that war."

-David Barrett, McMaster University "Gruhl, the former chief of NASA's Cost and Economic Analysis Branch, has a thesis that even American exceptionalists have to accept: war in the Pacific was at least as much about Shanghai, Nanking, and Manila as it was about Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Hiroshima. He tells the long, twisted, and brutal tale in crisp, forthright prose, buttressed by solid research. He sees racialism in the Land of the Rising Sun as analogous to its Nazi German ally's: "Militarist Japan's barbarity and violence in Asia...rivaled the Holocaust in Europe." It's worth recalling that the Japanese still routinely and officially reject and contest accusations concerning Chinese atrocities as well as other war crimes against fellow asians, who, as Hirohito wrote, apparently without irony, "Consistently cooperated with the Empire towards the emancipation of East Asia."

"-World War II Magazine"

""Imperial Japan's World War Two" is a full and unique statement of Japanese war crimes during fourteen years of conflict. No other single publication includes such a complete listing of atrocities (and, even then, Gruhl has missed a few), nor anything near the author's compelling statistical analysis of those appalling war crimes. His compilation of human suffering goes beyond any other single source in its gruesome totality. And his succinct refutation of revisionist views on relative guilt and on means of ending the great Pacific/Asiatic conflict is a fitting conclusion to his impressive cataloging of Japan's atrocious behavior."

-Stanley L. Falk, "Journal of Military History"
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