An Impartial Examination of the Second Volume of Mr. Daniel Neal's History of the Puritans; In Which the Reflections of That Author, Upon King James I. and King Charles I. Are Proved to Be Groundless

An Impartial Examination of the Second Volume of Mr. Daniel Neal's History of the Puritans; In Which the Reflections of That Author, Upon King James I. and King Charles I. Are Proved to Be Groundless

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1736 edition. Excerpt: ...of good place, was em ploy'd about it from the Bishops, and effected it, andlcould name him; but since it is here charged as a Fault I shall accuse no Man else, but defend myself. But for the establishing of that Court in that Kingdom, that was done long before I wasa Bishop, or had any thing to do in the Publick. For it appears by one of the great est Factionisis in that Kingdom, Calderwood Al tar. Damasc. p. 28. That the High-Commission Court was settled, and in full execution in the = Church of Scotland in the Year 1610. when all Men know, Iled a private Life in Oxford; by which it is more than manifest, that I neither was, or could be Author of this pretended Novation, or any Disturbances that followed from it) Neal, ibid. His directing the taking down of GalIeries and Stone-Walls in the Kirk: of Edinburgh, and St. Andrews, to make tway for zYZ/ars, and Adoration tozezards tbe East. 1' As for the taking down of the Galleries of St. Andrews, to the utermost of my Memory, I neither gave Command or Direction, nor can it stand with any shew of Probability, that I shoud command the taking down of Galleries in St. An draws, wherel had nothing to do, and let Galle ries stand in so many Churches in London, and ' other Parts of my Province, where I had Power, A Troubles and Trial, p. 94. 'k 15. p. 96. &it. Esic. Be Galleries what they will for use, I comF manded not the taking them down at St. zsndrewtss. At Edinhurgh, the King's Command took down the Stone-Walls and Galleries, which were there ing in a Christian, and a Princely way, erected and endowed a Bishoprick in Edinhurgh z he resolved to make the Great Church of St. Giles in that City a Cathedral: and to this end gave orz der to have the Galleries in the lesser Church, and the Stone-Wall...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 40 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 91g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123654384X
  • 9781236543844