An Impartial Account of King James II's Behaviour to His Protestant Subjects of Ireland; By His Grace, William, Lord Archbishop of Dublin

An Impartial Account of King James II's Behaviour to His Protestant Subjects of Ireland; By His Grace, William, Lord Archbishop of Dublin

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1746 edition. Excerpt: ...when it was in their Power to pursue.and hang them. And they had all the Reason in the 'World to believe, that a Government, that had armed such Men of desperate Fortunes and Resolutions, was 'so far from protecting them, which is the only End of all Government, 'that on the contrary it designed to destroy both their Lives and Fortunes. The latter of which, as will appear by the Sequel, they in a manner intirely lost. The Support and Happiness of a Kingdom consists chiefly in the equal and impartial Administration of Justice; and that depends on the Choice of fit and duly qualified Persons for filling the Courts, and executing the Laws; by those Laws no Man was capable ot being a Judge, who had not taken the Oath of Supremacy.-The Judges he found on the Bench had taken it; but yet some of them were known to be rather too favourable to Papists; and, considering G 2 tk the Influence King James had in his Brother's Time in disposing of Offices, it is not to be imagined, that Re would suffer any Man to sit as_ a Judge, who had not been favourably represented unto him in that Point; though we must own he was mistaken in some of them: Hence it came that Protestants did frequently complain of the Favour and Countenance their Adverfaries found in the Courts of Justice, even in King Charles the lid's Time. But when King James came to the Crown, moderate, nay favourable Judges would not do the Work he designed. He found it necessary to employ the most zealous of his Party; thole who, both by Interest and Inclination, were most deeply engaged to destroy the Protestant Englijh Interest; and accordingly such were picked out and set on all the Benches. The Chancery is the great and highest Court, wherein the great Frauds and other Matters belonging to Trusts...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 28 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 2mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • Illustrations, black and white
  • 1236552474
  • 9781236552471