Immigrants Outside Megalopolis

Immigrants Outside Megalopolis : Ethnic Transformation in the Heartland

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Description

Immigrants Outside Megalopolis documents the shift of immigrants toward smaller towns and metropolitan areas in the United States, presenting eleven case studies of immigrant groups in widely differing parts of the country. These case studies highlight both the new cultural landscapes that are giving Americans a world geography lesson, and the tales of accommodation and acceptance, of rejection and discrimination, that suggest that the process of social adjustment is not yet complete.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 332 pages
  • 136 x 230 x 22mm | 662.24g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 0739119192
  • 9780739119198

Review quote

In this extremely informative collection, Richard Jones's objective to provide a wider, comparative examination of the adjustment experiences of new immigrant groups outside the country's traditional destination metropolis is not only successful, it evenconfounds his own somewhat skeptical expectations. As this collection documents, in both the East and West, non-megalopolitan America is adjusting to the presence of new immigrants from diverse global regions, and the final analysis is largely, (indeedoverwhelmingly) positive. This collection once again confirms that America is still the 'immigrant nation' it has always been since the Encounter and onward through its nation-building history to the present era. The social, cultural, and economic vigorthese new immigrant groups bring revitalizes our society, strengthens it and brings diversity, which inevitably becomes welcomed rather than disavowed, as this most recent wave of newcomers overcomes the resentments and suspicions of the residing 'host' communities, that have commonly accompanied 'others' presences during the initial 'encounters'. -- Dennis Conway, Indiana University, Bloomington This book is a significant addition to the emerging literature on immigration taking place outside of America's gateway cities. The chapters capture the richly varied ways in which recent immigrants are adapting to destination communities and, in the process, creating new cultural landscapes. It will appeal to migration scholars from all disciplines. -- Kavita Pandit, The State University of New York The 11 original case studies in this important collection by geographers and other social scientists each focus on one new immigrant group in one location...These essays may not calm the furious debate over new immigrants, but the concrete data they provide cannot be simply ignored. Highly recommended. CHOICE, February 2009 From Leadville to Utica and Portland to Charlotte, recent immigrants are touching, and being touched by, a great variety of places across the United States. The geographic approach embraced by this volume adds rich knowledge to our understanding of this variety in the early 21st century. -- Curtis C. Roseman, University of Southern California In this extremely informative collection, Richard Jones's objective to provide a wider, comparative examination of the adjustment experiences of new immigrant groups outside the country's traditional destination metropolis is not only successful, it even confounds his own somewhat skeptical expectations. As this collection documents, in both the East and West, non-megalopolitan America is adjusting to the presence of new immigrants from diverse global regions, and the final analysis is largely, (indeed overwhelmingly) positive. This collection once again confirms that America is still the 'immigrant nation' it has always been since the Encounter and onward through its nation-building history to the present era. The social, cultural, and economic vigor these new immigrant groups bring revitalizes our society, strengthens it and brings diversity, which inevitably becomes welcomed rather than disavowed, as this most recent wave of newcomers overcomes the resentments and suspicions of the residing 'host' communities, that have commonly accompanied 'others' presences during the initial 'encounters'. -- Dennis Conway, Indiana University, Bloomingtonshow more

About Richard C. Jones

Richard C. Jones is professor of geography in the department of political science and geography at the University of Texas at San Antonio.show more

Table of contents

Part 1 Preface Part 2 Part One: Introduction Chapter 3 Chapter 1: Immigrants Transform and are Transformed by the U.S. Heartland Part 4 Part Two: Western United States Chapter 5 Chapter 2: Slavic Dreams: Post Soviet Refugee Identity and Adaptation in Portland, Oregon Chapter 6 Chapter 3: Emigres Outside Miami: The Cuban Experience in Metropolitan Phoenix Chapter 7 Chapter 4: Trying to Be Authentic, But Not Too Authentic: Second Generation Hindu Americans in Dallas, Texas Chapter 8 Chapter 5: Spatial Disjunctures and Division in the New West: Latino Immigration to Leadville, Colorado Chapter 9 Chapter 6: Meatpacking and Mexicans on the High Plains: From Minority to Majority in Garden City, Kansas Chapter 10 Chapter 7: Cultural Retrenchment and Economic Marginality: Mexican Immigrants in San Antonio Part 11 Part Three: Eastern United States Chapter 12 Chapter 8: Spaces and Places of Adaptation in an Ethnic Vietnamese Cluster in New Orleans, Louisiana Chapter 13 Chapter 9: The Quest for Home: Sheboygan's Hmong Population Chapter 14 Chapter 10: Getting Settled in the Heartland: Community Formation Among First- and Second-Generation Iranians in Iowa City, Iowa Chapter 15 Chapter 11: The Untraditional Geography of Hispanic Settlement in a New South City: Charlotte, North Carolina Chapter 16 Chapter 12: "An Anchor of Hope": Refugees in Utica, New York Part 17 Part Four: Epilogue Chapter 18 Chapter 13: The Contributions of Immigrants: From Megalopolis to Mainstreamshow more