Illustrations of Dissections in a Series of Original Colored Plates; The Size of Life, Representing the Dissection of the Human Body Volume 1

Illustrations of Dissections in a Series of Original Colored Plates; The Size of Life, Representing the Dissection of the Human Body Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1882 edition. Excerpt: ...16. Inferior maxillary nerve. 17. Large petrosal nerve. English anatomists reckon in general nine pairs of cranial nerves, and the anatomists on the Continent enumerate twelve pairs; so that some confusion in the nomenclature arises from this difference in the mode of numbering. The enumeration of the nerves as twelve appears most natural, as only two nerve The olfactory, or first cranial nerve, is marked by a bulb which rests on the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone, and sends filaments to the nose through the subjacent apertures: it will be found attached to the brain. The optic, or second nerve, 2, ends in the eyeball. Posteriorly the nerves of opposite sides unite in a commissure (chiasma) on the olivary eminence of the sphenoid bone, with a partial decussation of their fibres. In front the nerves diverge; and each issues from the skull through the optic foramen, witli the ophthalmic artery. In the orbit of the left side the further course of the nerve to the eyeball is evident. The motor oculi, or third nerve, 3, crosses the middle fossa, and enters its sheath of dura mater behind the anterior clinoid process, as seen on the left side. Contained in the dura mater, it is conveyed to the sphenoidal fissure, and supplies all the muscles moving the eyeball, except two. The trochlear, or fourth nerve, 4, is received into sheath of dura mater behind the posterior clinoid process, and courses forwards through the wall of the cavernous sinus to end in one muscle in the orbit--superior oblique. The trifacial, or fifth nerve, 5, consists of two roots, large and small, though only the large root is visible, for this lies over and conceals the small root. The large root enters a sheath of dura mater above the petrous portion of the temporal...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 84 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 4mm | 168g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 123673811X
  • 9781236738110