Illustrations and Descriptions of the Plants Which Compose the Natural Order Camellieae, and of the Varieties of Camellia Japonica

Illustrations and Descriptions of the Plants Which Compose the Natural Order Camellieae, and of the Varieties of Camellia Japonica

List price: US$15.83

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1831 edition. Excerpt: ...distinct variety. Some persons are of opinion that it was imported from China; but we believe it is now generally known to have been raised from seed of the double-striped, by Messrs. Rollisson, of the Tooting Nursery, about seventeen years ago. In growth and habit, it is more robust than almost any of the other sorts, and is readily distinguished by the great resemblance which its foliage bears to that of its parent. We may however observe that, although similar in form, yet the leaves of the present plant are much thicker and larger than those of the striped, and they are also more recurved and undulated. The serratures are particularly large and sharp. Some of the leaves, indeed, may be more properly described as being dentated, rather than serrated. All of them are of a very dark shining green, and have a strong, prominent, pale-coloured midrib. The footstalks are thick, and seldom exceed a quarter of an inch in length. They are of the same colour as the midrib. The under side is round; the upper is a little flattened, and hollowed towards the base of the leaf. The flower buds are ovate, and taper to a point; most of them are upwards of an inch long, very pubescent, and of a pale green colour. The flowers, which are produced in great abundance, usually open earlier in the season than the generality of the other Camellias. They are large and handsome, and consist of from four to six roundish-cordate, white petals, imbricated at the base, and arranged in such a manner as to give the flower an upright, bell-shaped appearance, like that of the single red, represented at folio 1. K Each of the petals is about an inch and a half in diameter, much undulated, and recurved at the edges. When the flowers have been sometime open, they measure...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 26 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 1mm | 68g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236918797
  • 9781236918796