Illustrations of British Entomology, or a Synopsis of Indigenous Insects; Containing Their Generic and Specific Distinctions Embellished with Coloured Figures of the Rarer and More Interesting Species. Haustellata 2 Volume 1-2

Illustrations of British Entomology, or a Synopsis of Indigenous Insects; Containing Their Generic and Specific Distinctions Embellished with Coloured Figures of the Rarer and More Interesting Species. Haustellata 2 Volume 1-2

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1829 edition. Excerpt: ...cabbage, &c, hiding itself by day, beneath stones, clods, &c, and coming out in the evening to feed: it is found throughout the winter; and in the spring, about April or May, it changes to an elongate reddish pupa, which emerges in its final state in the beginning of June, or as late as the middle of July. One of the most abundant of the indigenous Lepidoptera, at least throughout the south of England; and, I believe, far from uncommon in other parts; frequenting hedges and gardens. " York and Newcastle.11--W. C. Hewitson, Esq. Sp. 4. innuba. Alts anticis hepaticis, margint antici thoraceqve concohribus, posticis luteis, strigi submarginali nigra. (Exp. alar. 2 unc.--2 unc 4 lin.) Tr. innuba. Ochsenheimer.--Steph. Catal. pt. Up. 63. JVo. 6067. Differs from the preceding by having the head, thorax, and anterior wings concolorous, without a pale anterior streak, as in that insect: these parts are in general of a very deep fuscous, or rusty-brown, but the markings are throughout similar in their dispositions to those of Tr. pronuba, though usually they are more obsolete, and in some examples nearly obliterated: the stigmata are mostly dark, with a pale ring; and, as in the last named insect, the anterior one varies considerably in form: the posterior wings are similar to those of Tr. pronuba. This is equally variable with the foregoing species, and sometimes occurs nearly ferruginous. Ochsenheimer gives this as a distinct species from the preceding; but I think with Boisduval, that it is a mere variety of that insect, as the only difference between them appears to consist in the dissimilar colour of the head, and anterior margin of the thorax and anterior wings, and in the usually deeper colour of the insect. Feund equally common, and...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 94 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 5mm | 181g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236515978
  • 9781236515971