Illustrations in Advocacy; Examples of Conducting the Prosecution and Defense of Civil and Criminal Cases, Including Methods of Cross-Examination

Illustrations in Advocacy; Examples of Conducting the Prosecution and Defense of Civil and Criminal Cases, Including Methods of Cross-Examination : Also Cicero's Defense of Roscius for Murder, and the Story of the Tichborne Trial Retold

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1885 edition. Excerpt: ... ever "of counsel for the prisoner." He is not the Crown, but he is the crowning glory of our administration of justice. No man in this country can ever lose his life against the conscience of the judge who tries him. Strictly impartial and yet sympathetic; rigorously just and yet tenderly protective. An _ English judge trying a man for murder is the highest and noblest illustration of the human character. I say this, not to compliment the Bench, but to encourage the youthful advocate on whom the task of defending in such a charge may fall. Let me now_ remind you that you must not crossexamine to any fact which is in your favor. Whether you should cross-examine to a fact which is neither for nor against you depends upon your skill, your knowledge of human nature, and your confidence in yourself. If you know that you will not make a mistake, cross-examine by all means, because a neutral fact may be turned to your advantage, and if it be ever so slightly shifted or altered in appearance it will form the foundation of an argument, while every argument in the prisoner's favor is something towards a verdict. Remember, too, that in cases of life and death arguments will sometimes neutralize facts. I say this from experience, and therefore the more boldly. all. This was a point to elicit tenderly in crossexamination. As the law holds opportunity in its strictness, there was opportunity indeed; but what if the jury should think differently? What if the judge should even think this a point not to be lost sight of in an appeal for the exercise of the roval prerogative? Let it then for the dear life, be crossexamined too. Thus it came out that the prisoner had been hurried from his cell to the dying woman's bedside a few hours...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 62 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 127g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236887506
  • 9781236887504