The Illustrated Record of the International Exhibition of the Industrial Arts and Manufactures, and the Fine Arts 1862, by T.P. Shaffner and W. Owen

The Illustrated Record of the International Exhibition of the Industrial Arts and Manufactures, and the Fine Arts 1862, by T.P. Shaffner and W. Owen

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1862 edition. Excerpt: ...a rail thirty-four metres long. The plates and axles of the Socie'te de l'Heure were of the first-rate quality. The sheet-iron of Belgium was distinguished by an equable, smooth, and dark surface: some specimens being shown as they came from the roller, and othershighly polished. These productions are the more creditable to the Belgian manufacturers, as they are obliged, by the poverty of their country in ironstones in the coal-measures, to search elsewhere--among the irregular masses of hydrated oxide (limonite), found in connection with the sub-carboniferous limestones, yielding from 30 to 40 per cent. An important accession to their supplies has been obtained by the discovery, within the last ten or twelve years, of a bed of red pisolitic ore (peastone, oligiste), at the base of the carboniferous-limestone, and traced from east to west to a great extent. Austria is rich in iron ores, and skilful in working them. The Austrians tell us that, with the exception of Upper Austria, the Littorale, Dalmatia, and Venice, all the provinces of the empire yield quantities of iron. Styria and Carinthia furnish more than two-fifths of the ores; Hungary above three millions; Bohemia more than two millions and a-half cwts. of ores. From the different nature of the iron ores, the northern provinces may produce many cast-iron wares; whereas the southern provinces are principally engaged in the production of pig-iron, for being worked into refined iron and steel. At present, nearly all the Austrian smelting-works use charcoal; but some few coke. Pit-coal and turf are nowhere exclusively used; but in Bohemia, Moravia, and Silesia, coal and coke are the principal fuels employed. About 1,000,000 tons of iron ore are annually used in the Austrian furnaces;...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 176 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 10mm | 327g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236606116
  • 9781236606112