The Illustrated Horse Management; Containing Descriptive Remarks Upon Anatomy, Medicine, Shoeing, Teeth, Food, Vices, Stables

The Illustrated Horse Management; Containing Descriptive Remarks Upon Anatomy, Medicine, Shoeing, Teeth, Food, Vices, Stables

By (author) 

List price: US$28.20

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1868 edition. Excerpt: ...but should begin most gently, and very gradually become more speedy. Such treatment, with carefully prepared food, plenty of old beans, bran mashes for laxatives, and an occasional tonic, is the best means the author knows of to render the quadruped ultimately useful. The power of kindness is, perhaps, shown most strongly in the case of the horse thus affected. The love of the creature for the individual who is fond of it, is not well or truly characterized when spoken of as affection: it is something more than such a general term can represent: it amounts to positive devotion. Even when the fit is strongest, and all ordinary sounds are lost to the animal's sense, the voice of the person who has been constantly kind will evidently be responded to. His caresses will soothe at a moment when the most potent pangs would be powerless: his presence will restrain the wildness which naturally ensues upon the first dawn of reviving consciousness. Whereas he who is habitually a careless or a harsh master, in whose hand whip and reins are equally instruments of torture, may, only by his appearance, induce the attack; and his foot upon the vehicle is likely to generate the agitation which shall assuredly bring on the disease.. But the man who would win the love of his steed, and is fond of the animal, should be a frequent visitor to its abode. That simple or negative quality which consists in the absence of actual cruelty, will answer no end. The human being, thus distinguished, only elicits the passive indifference by which his treatment is characterized. It is feeling, which even in animals, responds to feeling. The horse and the dog love those who like to take pains with them, or submit to trouble for their sakes. The two animals are alike in this...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 198 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 11mm | 363g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236650468
  • 9781236650467