The Illustrated History of the Centennial Exhibition, Held in Commemoration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of American Independence; With a Full Description of the Great Buildings and All the Objects of Interest on Exhibition in Them

The Illustrated History of the Centennial Exhibition, Held in Commemoration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of American Independence; With a Full Description of the Great Buildings and All the Objects of Interest on Exhibition in Them

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1876 edition. Excerpt: ...is so interesting that we give it here as related by Mr. Justice Bradley, of the Supreme Court of the United States, in a letter to Mr. D. _M. Meeker: " Wssmxorox, September 20th, 1875. " DAVID M. MEEKER, Esq.: "Dear Sir: The steam-engine of which you possess a relic was, as you suppose, the first ever erected on this continent. It was imported from England in the year 1753 by Colonel John Schuyler, for the purpose of pumping water from his copper mine opposite Belleville, near Newark, New Jersey. The mine was rich in ore, but had been workedas deep as hand and horse power could clear it of water. Colonel Schuyler, having heard of the success with which steam--engines (then called fireeugines) were used in the mines of Cornwall, determined to have one in his mine. He accordingly requested his London correspondents to procure an engine, and to send out with it an engineer capable of putting it up and in operation. This was done in the year named, and JOSIAH HORNBLOWER, a young man, then in his twenty-fifth year, was sent out to superintend it. The voyage was a long and perilous one. Mr. Hornblower expected to return as soon as the engine was in successful operation. But the proprietor induced him to remain, and in the course of a couple of years he married Miss Kingsland, whose father owned a large plantation adjoining that of Colonel Schuyler. The late Chief-Justice Hornblower was the youngest of a large family of children which resulted from this marriage. Mr. Hornblower's father, whose name was Joseph, had been engaged in the business of constructing engines in Cornwall from their first introduction in the mines there, about 1740; and had been an engineer and engine-builder from the first use of steam-engines in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 246 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 13mm | 445g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236978080
  • 9781236978080