Illustrated Guide to London and Neighbourhood; Being a Concise Description of the Chief Places of Interest in the Metropolis, and the Best Modes of Obtaining Access to Them, with Information Relating to Railways, Omnibuses, Steamers, &C

Illustrated Guide to London and Neighbourhood; Being a Concise Description of the Chief Places of Interest in the Metropolis, and the Best Modes of Obtaining Access to Them, with Information Relating to Railways, Omnibuses, Steamers, &C

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1875 edition. Excerpt: ... in 1828, on a site which required the removal of more than 1,200 houses and 13,000 inhabitants; the earth obtained by the excavation was employed in raising the site for some of the new streets and squares at Pimlico. There are twelve acres of water area, and about as much of quays and warehouses. On the south of the Thames are the Commercial and the Grand Surrey Docks, the great centre of the timber trade. The various docks are the property of joint-stock companies, who receive rents and dues of various kinds for their use. Thames Tunnel.--With the view of effecting a ready communication for wagons and other carriages, and foot-passengers, between the Surrey and Middlesex sides of the river, at a point where, from the constant passage of shipping, it would be inconvenient to rear a bridge, a tunnel or sub-river passage was designed by a jointstock company. The idea of tunnelling under the river, by the way, was not a novel one. In 1802 a company was got up with a similar notion, Trevethick, the inventor of the high-pressure engine, being its engineer. It came to nought; and in 1825 Mr. (afterwards Sir) Marc Isambard Brunel began his tunnel, at a point about two miles below London Bridge, entering on the southern shore at Rotherhithe, and issuing at Wapping on the other. The water broke in in 1827, and again in 1828, when six men perished. After all the funds were exhausted, and the Government had advanced no less than 246,000 by way of loan, the work, after many delays, was opened in 1843. The total cost was 468,000. The tunnel consisted of two archways, 1,300 feet long, the thickness of the earth being about 15 feet between the crown of the tunnel and the river's bed. As a speculation--toll Id.--it never paid. The descent was by a...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 64 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 132g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236526511
  • 9781236526519