The Ideal of a Christian Church; Considered in Comparison with Existing Practice, Containing a Defence of Certain Articles in the British Critic in Reply to Remarks on Them in Mr. Palmer's 'Narrative'

The Ideal of a Christian Church; Considered in Comparison with Existing Practice, Containing a Defence of Certain Articles in the British Critic in Reply to Remarks on Them in Mr. Palmer's 'Narrative'

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1844 edition. Excerpt: ...God on the contrary, who desires only our salvation, gives particular light to His elect, to make them perceive even the least of their imperfections; and hides the favours He bestows upon them in such manner, that often they perceive not when they receive them. AH holy writers teach the same doctrine; and St. Bernard says, that it is by a particular disposition of the divine goodness, which is pleased to keep us humble, that the greater progress one ordinarily makes in perfection the less he thinks he has made; for when any one is arrived to the highest degree of virtue, God permits that something of the perfection of the lowest should yet remain to be acquired, that he may not think he is advanced so far as he is. Thus the comparison, which is made between humility and the sun, is a very just one; for as the stars disappear, and hide themselves before -the sun, so when humility shines truly in souls, all other virtues hide themselves before it in such manner, that they who are humble indeed, seem to themselves to have no virtue at all. They are the only persons, says St. Gregory, who see not in themselves the exemplary virtues which all the world admires. When Moses came down from Mount Sinai, where he had forty days conversed with God face to face, his countenance shone so bright, that all the children of Israel, says the Scripture, beheld it, and he alone knew not that his face was shining, because of the conversation he had had with the Lord. So it is with the humble man; he alone sees not his own virtues; and whatever he does see in himself, appears full of imperfections; nay, he even thinks, that he sees but the least part of his faults; and that those which he sees not, are much more numerous; and thus can he easily look upon himself...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 224 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 408g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236671724
  • 9781236671721