I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Mechanics,

I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Mechanics,

By (author) 

List price: US$34.18

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1894 edition. Excerpt: ... he says, "not knowing the value of what he possessed (his system), undertook to represent Ptolemy, rather than nature, to which, however, he had approached more nearly than any other person. For being rejoiced that the quantity of the latitude of each planet was increased by the approach of the earth to the planet, according to his theory, he did not venture to reject the rest of Ptolemy's increase of latitude, but in order to express it, devised librations of the planes of the eccentric, depending not upon its own eccentric, but (most improbably) upon the orbit of the earth, which has nothing to do with it. I always fought against this impertinent tying together of two orbits, even before I saw the observations of Tycho; and I therefore rejoice much that in this, as in others of my preconceived opinions, the observations were found to be on my side." Kepler estabblished his point by a fair and laborious calculation of the results of observations of Mars made by himself and Tycho Brahe; and had a right to exult when the result of these calculations confirmed his views of the symmetry and simplicity of nature. We may judge of the difiiculty of casting off the theory of eccentrics and epicycles, by recollecting that Copernicus did not do it at all, and that Kepler only did it after repeated struggles; the history of which occupies thirty-nine Chapters of his book. At the end of them he says, " This prolix disputation was necessary, in order to prepare the way to the natural form of the equations, of which I am now to treat.' My first error was, that the path of a planet is a perfect circle;--an opinion which was a more mischievous thief of my time, " De Stelld Martis, iii. 40..n proportion as it was...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 222 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 404g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236803795
  • 9781236803795