I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Mechanics,

I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Mechanics,

By (author) 

List price: US$33.66

Currently unavailable

Add to wishlist

AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window).

Try AbeBooks

Description

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...and for the candor and copiousness with which he narrated them; his works are in this way extremely curious and amusing; and are a very instructive exhibition of the mental process of discovery. But in this respect, I venture to believe, they exhibit to us the usual process (somewhat caricatured) of inventive minds: they rather exemplify the rule of genius than (as has generally been hitherto taught) the exception. We may add, that if many of Kepler's guesses now appear fanciful and absurd, because time and observation have refuted them, others, which were at the time equally gratuitous, have been confirmed by succeeding discoveries in a manner which makes them appear marvellously sagacious; as, for instance, his assertion of the rotation of the sun on his axis, before the invention of the telescope, and his opinion that the obliquity of the ecliptic was decreasing, but would, after a long-continued diminution, stop, and then increase again.I Nothing can be more just, as well as more poetically happy, than Kepler's picture of the philosopher's pursuit of scientific truth, conveyed by means of an allusion to Virgil's shepherd and shepherdess: Malo me Galatca petit, lasciva paella Et fugit ad salices et se cupit ante videri. Coy yet inviting, Galatea loves To sport in sight, then plunge into the groves; The challenge given, she darts along the green, Will not be caught, yet would not run unseen. We may notice as another peculiarity of Kepler's reasonings, the length and laboriousness of the processes by which he discovered the errors of his first guesses. One of the most important talents requisite for a discoverer, is the ingenuity and skill which devises means for rapidly testing false suppositions as they...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 218 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236755677
  • 9781236755674