I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Volume 1

I. the Greek School Philosophy, with Reference to Physical Science. II. the Physical Sciences in Ancient Greece. III. Greek Astronomy. IV. Physical Science in the Middle Ages. V. Formal Astronomy After the Stationary Period. VI. Volume 1

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1858 edition. Excerpt: ...he was not even a good arithmetical calculator, often making mistakes, some of which he detected and laments, while others escaped him to the last. But his defects in this respect were compensated by his courage and perseverance in undertaking and executing such tasks; and, what was still more admirable, he never allowed the labor he had spent upon any conjecture to produce any reluctance in abandoning the hypothesis, as soon as he had evidence of its inaccuracy. The only way in which he rewarded himself for his trouble, was by describing to the world, in his lively manner, his schemes, exertions, and feelings. The mystical parts of Kepler's opinions, as his belief in astrology, his persuasion that the earth was an animal, and many of the loose moral and spiritual as well as sensible analyses by which he represented to himself the powers which he supposed to prevail in the universe, do not appear to have interfered with his discovery, but rather to have stimulated his invention, and animated his exertions. Indeed, where there are clear scientific ideas on one subject in the mind, it does not appear that mysticism on others is at all unfavorable to the successful prosecution of research. I conceive, then, that we may consider Kepler's character as containing the general features of the character of a scientific discoverer, - Bailly, A. M. iii. 176. though some of the features are exaggerated, and some too feebly marked. His spirit of invention was undoubtedly very fertile and ready, and this and his perseverance served to remedy his deficiency in mathematical artifice and method. But the peculiar physiognomy is given to his intellectual aspect by his dwelling in a most prominent manner on those erroneovs trains of thought which other persons...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 218 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 12mm | 399g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • Miami Fl, United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236606140
  • 9781236606143