The Human Being in History

The Human Being in History : Freedom, Power, and Shared Ontological Meaning

2 (1 rating by Goodreads)
By (author)  , Translated by 

Free delivery worldwide

Available. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days
When will my order arrive?

Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas Not expected to be delivered to the United States by Christmas

Description

The Human Being in History affirms the ontological dignity of the human being, arguing that the challenges posed by the twenty-first century are not just political, economic, and social, but existential and metaphysical. In the face of these challenges, philosophy must show how to confront issues in a new way: not as problems that admit technical resolution, but as questions which involve openness to meaning and which demand the exercise of freedom.show more

Product details

  • Hardback | 144 pages
  • 149.86 x 231.14 x 15.24mm | 317.51g
  • Lexington Books
  • Lanham, MD, United States
  • English
  • 0739106856
  • 9780739106853

About Daniel H. Dei

H. Daniel Dei is Professor at the University of Moron. James G. Colbert is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Fitchburg State College.show more

Review quote

Daniel Dei's The Human Being in History: Freedom, Power, and Shared Ontological Meaning, is an illuminating contribution to the search for an answer to the questions of what it is to be human - anthropodicy - and of how we are to regard 'the other.'Dei challenges many conventional views. Yet his book goes beyond the postmodern critique of modernity to a critique of strands of postmodernity itself that propose just another metanarrative, and that simply extend modernity as much as challenge it. Coming from 'the margins' of the contemporary world, Dei offers the experience of Latin America as a guide for addressing this crisis of meaning that particularly affects post-industrial society characteristic of 'the center' - of European and American cultures.. -- William Sweet, St. Francis Xavier University There has been a remarkable renaissance of philosophy in Spanish speaking countries in the latter half of the Twentieth Century, with H. Daniel Dei representing Argentina's contribution. He fully engages the European crisis of modernity, but does so from the margins, to use his precise phrase. The results are not surprising: he uncovers the Euro-centrism continuing in postmodernism: the end of history is only the end of a history, the impossibility of metaphysics is really the limits of a certain style of reason, and language games (analytic or deconstructionist) stand on a premise of use rather than meaning. His alternative opens a path of hope and dialogue, both with the wisdom in pre-modern European philosophy and other world cultures. In fact, his anthropodicy is an openness to human beings in their freedom and limitation that goes beyond the domination that typifies the relation of modernity to the other. -- Gary M. Gurtler, S.J., Boston College Daniel Dei's The Human Being in History: Freedom, Power, and Shared Ontological Meaning, is an illuminating contribution to the search for an answer to the questions of what it is to be human - anthropodicy - and of how we are to regard 'the other.' Dei challenges many conventional views. Yet his book goes beyond the postmodern critique of modernity to a critique of strands of postmodernity itself that propose just another metanarrative, and that simply extend modernity as much as challenge it. Coming from 'the margins' of the contemporary world, Dei offers the experience of Latin America as a guide for addressing this crisis of meaning that particularly affects post-industrial society characteristic of 'the center' - of European and American cultures. -- William Sweet, St. Francis Xavier Universityshow more

Table of contents

Chapter 1 The Historical Consciousness of Postmodernity: Reparation of a Dystopia Chapter 2 The Sense of Philosophical Investigation Chapter 3 The Value of Freedom Chapter 4 Anthropodicy: The question of Man Chapter 5 Power and Freedom in Postmodern Society: Preliminary Remarks Chapter 6 Metaphysics of Power Chapter 7 Diagnosis of the Present Chapter 8 The Sense of What is to Come Chapter 9 Postmodern Metanarrative as Transvestite Logicshow more

Rating details

1 ratings
2 out of 5 stars
5 0% (0)
4 0% (0)
3 0% (0)
2 100% (1)
1 0% (0)
Book ratings by Goodreads
Goodreads is the world's largest site for readers with over 50 million reviews. We're featuring millions of their reader ratings on our book pages to help you find your new favourite book. Close X