How to Understand Music; A Concise Course in Musical Intelligence and Taste to Which Is Added a Pronouncing Dictionary and Condensed Encyclopedia of Musical Terms and Information

How to Understand Music; A Concise Course in Musical Intelligence and Taste to Which Is Added a Pronouncing Dictionary and Condensed Encyclopedia of Musical Terms and Information

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1880 edition. Excerpt: ...the order of emphasis, speaking weaker and yet weaker as the fatal moment of yielding nears. 'Lohengrin " is a true drama. Though founded on a myth, it deals with the eternal conflict between good and evil. This conflict here is veiled somewhat, and in this the nobility of the drama is elevated. For although the ending shows the separation of Lohengrin and Elsa, brought about by the evil working through Ortrud, the effect is reached without any loss of virtue in the hero and heroine who have occupied our attention. The ending has genuine pathos without tragedy. The different acts are symmetrically balanced over against each other. The evil stands in Ortrud and Frederick. The first act shows the wager of battle and the triumph of the right. The second act has the evil for its motive. The evil begins and well-nigh ends it. The third act shows a fictitious triumph for the evil. Yet it brings also the death of Frederick. The scenic effects are splendid. The first scene is extremely brilliant, and the entrance of Lohengrin is beautiful. The second act opens with a long duet between Ortrud and Frederick. This takes place in the night, on the steps of the church, where the bright moon casts a dark shadow. The subject matter of the dialogue is hate and vengeance, and it ends with Ortrud's profane appeal to false gods, uttered in the very shadow of a temple to Jehovah. The contrast here implied is forcible and poetically conceived. The scene is long, partly, perhaps, in order to allow the impression of the first act to subside. Then enters Elsa on the balcony, and her song of love is one of the purest and most beautiful on the stage. One analyzes it in vain to find its secret. It is not in the song alone, nor in the accompaniment, nor yet in...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 162 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 9mm | 299g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236842235
  • 9781236842237