How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age

How to Think About Weird Things: Critical Thinking for a New Age

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Description

How to Think about Weird Things, is a concise and engaging text that offers students a step-by-step process by which to determine when a claim is likely to be true. Schick and Vaughn provide a course on critical thinking- emphasizing neither debunking nor advocating specific claims, but rather explaining principles of good reasoning that enable students to evaluate any claim, no matter how strange, for themselves. By teaching readers how to distinguish good reasons from bad reasons for believing a claim, this text helps students improve their decision-making abilities and provides them with a powerful weapon against all forms of hucksterism.
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Product details

  • Paperback
  • 160 x 231 x 12mm | 399g
  • OH, United States
  • 8th edition
  • 1260548074
  • 9781260548075
  • 744,621

Table of contents

ForewordPreface
Chapter 1Introduction: Close Encounters with the StrangeThe Importance of WhyBeyond Weird to the AbsurdA Weirdness Sampler
Notes
Chapter 2The Possibility of the ImpossibleParadigms and the ParanormalLogical Possibility Versus Physical ImpossibilityThe Possibility of ESPTheories and ThingsOn Knowing the Future
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion QuestionsField ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 3Arguments Good, Bad, and WeirdClaims and ArgumentsDeductive ArgumentsInductive ArgumentsEnumerative InductionAnalogical InductionHypothetical Induction (Abduction, or Inference to the Best Explanation)Informal FallaciesUnacceptable PremisesBegging the QuestionFalse DilemmaIrrelevant PremisesEquivocationCompositionDivisionAppeal to the PersonGenetic FallacyAppeal to AuthorityAppeal to the MassesAppeal to TraditionAppeal to IgnoranceAppeal to FearStraw ManInsufficient PremisesHasty GeneralizationFaulty AnalogyFalse CauseSlippery SlopeStatistical FallaciesMisleading AveragesMissing ValuesHazy ComparisonsEvaluating Sources: Fake News
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion QuestionsField ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 4Knowledge, Belief, and EvidenceBabylonian Knowledge-Acquisition TechniquesPropositional KnowledgeReasons and EvidenceExpert OpinionCoherence and JustificationSources of KnowledgeThe Appeal to FaithThe Appeal to IntuitionThe Appeal to Mystical ExperienceAstrology Revisited
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion Questions Field ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 5Looking for Truth in Personal ExperienceSeeming and BeingPerceiving: Why You Can't Always Believe What You SeePerceptual ConstanciesThe Role of ExpectationLooking for Clarity in VaguenessThe Blondlot Case"Constructing" UFOsRemembering: Why You Can't Always Trust What You Recall Conceiving: Why You Sometimes See What You BelieveDenying the EvidenceSubjective ValidationConfirmation BiasThe Availability ErrorThe Representativeness HeuristicAnthropomorphic BiasAgainst All OddsAnecdotal Evidence: Why Testimonials Can't Be TrustedThe Variable Nature of IllnessThe Placebo EffectOverlooked CausesScientific Evidence: Why Controlled Studies Can Be TrustedSummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion Questions Field ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 6Science and Its PretendersScience and DogmaScience and ScientismScientific MethodologyConfirming and Refuting HypothesesCriteria of AdequacyTestabilityFruitfulnessScopeSimplicityConservatismCreationism, Evolution, and Criteria of AdequacyScientific CreationismIntelligent DesignParapsychology
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion QuestionsField ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 7Case Studies in the ExtraordinaryThe SEARCH FormulaStep 1: State the ClaimStep 2: Examine the Evidence for the ClaimStep 3: Consider Alternative HypothesesStep 4: Rate, According to the Criteria of Adequacy, Each HypothesisHomeopathyIntercessory PrayerUFO AbductionsCommunicating with the DeadNear-Death ExperiencesGhostsConspiracy TheoriesClimate Change
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsField ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
Chapter 8Relativism, Truth, and RealityWe Each Create Our Own Reality <
span style="white-space:pre">Reality Is Socially ConstructedReality Is Constituted by Conceptual SchemesThe Relativist's PetardFacing Reality
SummaryStudy QuestionsEvaluate These ClaimsDiscussion QuestionsField ProblemCritical Reading and WritingNotes
CreditsIndex
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About Theodore Schick

Theodore Schick received his B.A. in philosophy from Harvard University and his Ph.D. from Brown University. He is currently professor of philosophy at Muhlenberg College where he has served as Director of Academic Computing, Director of Freshman Seminars, Director of the Muhlenberg Scholars Program, and Chair of the Philosophy Department. He is the author of Doing Philosophy: An Introduction through Thought Experiments, the editor of The Philosophy of Science: From Positivism to Post-modernism, and has published articles in several fields of philosophy including: philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion, philosophy of language, meta-philosophy, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. He has also contributed to a number of volumes in Open Courts Philosophy and Popular Culture series as well as Blackwells Philosophy for Everyone series.



Lewis Vaughn is the author of numerous textbooks in philosophy, critical thinking, and ethics, including The Power of Critical Thinking, sixth edition (2019); Concise Guide to Critical Thinking (2017); Philosophy Here and Now, third edition (2019); Living Philosophy: A Historical Introduction to Philosophical Ideas, second edition (2018); Doing Ethics: Moral Reasoning, Theory, and Contemporary Issues, fifth edition (2019); Beginning Ethics: An Introduction to Moral Philosophy (2015); Bioethics: Principles, Issues, and Cases, third edition (2017); and Writing Philosophy, Second Edition (2018).
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