How to Build Up Furnace Efficiency; A Hand-Book of Fuel Economy (Including a Few Snorts about Industrial Efficiency and Other Things).

How to Build Up Furnace Efficiency; A Hand-Book of Fuel Economy (Including a Few Snorts about Industrial Efficiency and Other Things).

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1916 edition. Excerpt: ...a fuel loss on account of the CO which is due to a deficiency of air. Draft gages are of great assistance to the fireman. They e'nable him to give each boiler furnace the exact draft that it should have--the standard draft for the plant, whatever that draft may be. They enable him to spot the fire that is getting in bad condition. The gage will show an increased draft when the fires are too thick or are becoming dirty. It will show a decreased draft when the fires are too thin or when they are burning full of cracks and holes. The gage when properly connected will show the draft loss between the uptake and the boiler furnace. If the loss is less than normal, you will know that something has happened to reduce the-friction in the boiler passes, that the baffling has burned out or has broken down and that the gases are short-circuiting. If the draft loss is more than normal you will know that something has happened to increase friction, that there are deposits of soot and ash upon the tubes and perhaps slag, soot and ash accumulations upon the baffles and the brick work of the setting. These deposits upon the tubes affect both the efficiency and capacity of the boiler by resisting the passage of heat energy from the gases to the water in the boiler. They make the chimney work harder to give the required draft to the furnace. And they will be found among the chickens that come home to roost once a month upon the coal bill. A Glimpse of Soot Upon the rear tubes of a Stirling boiler. The soot was a quarter of an inch thick. Note where it was cut away with a knife to uncover the metal and make a contrast for the picture. The boiler was out of service for thirty days for tube renewals and was cut back into service without cleaning. CAN YOU BEAT...show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 48 pages
  • 189 x 246 x 3mm | 104g
  • Rarebooksclub.com
  • United States
  • English
  • black & white illustrations
  • 1236935462
  • 9781236935465